Charles baudelaire – Commonfolk Using Common Sense http://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/ Thu, 21 Oct 2021 15:32:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-99.png Charles baudelaire – Commonfolk Using Common Sense http://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/ 32 32 New York Times Birth Book Review https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/new-york-times-birth-book-review/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/new-york-times-birth-book-review/#respond Thu, 21 Oct 2021 14:55:15 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/new-york-times-birth-book-review/ As we celebrate The New York Times Book Review’s 125th anniversary, take a journey with us through the newspaper’s early years as we examine how its literary coverage began – and how it evolved and grew before being derived into the book. Journal as we know it today. It all started in the very first […]]]>

As we celebrate The New York Times Book Review’s 125th anniversary, take a journey with us through the newspaper’s early years as we examine how its literary coverage began – and how it evolved and grew before being derived into the book. Journal as we know it today.

It all started in the very first issue of the New York Daily Times on September 18, 1851. Look closely at the old, yellowed pages, densely spotted with six columns of tiny, often smeared characters, and there – in an article on Page 2 titled “Snap-Shots at Books, Talk and Town, ”the newspaper outlined its ambitious plans to cover the books and publishing industry.

“Librarians are instantly bidding on the glut of summer literature, and sometimes it might be worth taking our readers to the halls of that traffic,” the newspaper said. “Sometimes we, too, take note of the books of the day – unravel their narrative in a newspaper column and give the audience, whom we have taken in hand to serve, a running synopsis of their history. And if we do, from time to time, critically strike in their own way, method, or morality, we will do so with all the modesty, and perhaps the occasional hiccup, that belongs to our rapid fire.

No time was wasted. The next day the newspaper featured a column on authors and artists titled “Limnings of Literary People” and on September 22 the first book reviews appeared. They included gems such as “The United States Post-Office Guide” and a seemingly execrable novel titled “Kenneth: A Romance of the Highlands,” which began criticism, “Mr. Reynolds is a bad specimen of a very bad school of writers.

The book reviews, published at least once a week, were clear and to the point. DJ Browne’s “American Muck Book”, for example, received one-line praise as “undoubtedly a most valuable aid to the farmer who admits science to the service of agriculture”. Two novels from 1851 that we now consider important have not been reviewed: “Moby-Dick” by Herman Melville, which came out a few weeks after the Times began to publish, and “The House of the Seven Gables” by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

The second half of the nineteenth century is rich in riches: “There were giants of literature, and pygmies too, on earth,” writes Francis Brown, who edited the Book Review from 1949 to 1971. “It was the period of Trollope and Dickens and Thackeray, of Whitman, Longfellow, Tennyson and Baudelaire, of Darwin and Huxley, of the Russians Turgenev, Dostoyevky and Tolstoy. With a few notable exceptions, the article covered all of the important books published during those decades.

“Villette”, by Charlotte Brontë, has been hailed as “a first-class work”. An anonymous reviewer struggled with “Leaves of Grass,” first calling Walt Whitman a “literary fraud” and then confessing, “Nonetheless, this man has some brave things about him. … Since most of this review was written, we admit that we have been drawn to “Leaves of Grass” again and again. that after the most deliberate examination of Mr. Darwin’s arguments, we are still not convinced? “

Best-selling novels of the day were often first published in serial form, usually in magazines like Harper’s and Scribner’s, and the Times covered new chapters with fanfare. “The first sheets of ‘Bleak House’ – Dickens’ new novel – were received before their publication in London, for Harper’s Magazine,” the newspaper reported in a front page article on March 16, 1852. “They’ve got it clear. ring of real metal Although an editor once said that “we hate anything that is published in part,” the Times has nonetheless published its own soap operas, including “The Hand of Ethelberta” by Thomas Hardy.

Coverage of The Times’ early books extended far beyond reviews and soap operas. Holiday gift guides, publishing news, literary scandals, poems, summer readings, and recommendations for kids could all be found within the pages of the newspaper. In 1871, an editorial protested against the moral depravity of “flash literature”; in 1875, a male author wrote about the difficulties of dressing his female characters (the opening line: “What should I put on her head?”). Dime novels – the luscious westerns that were blamed for social ills, just as comics were in the mid-20th century and violent video games more recently – have featured in countless reports.

Literary stories, large and small, were considered newsworthy. A letter of support from Louisa May Alcott to the American Woman Suffrage Association has been reprinted in its entirety, as has Mark Twain’s remedy for the common cold: “Regular gin was recommended, then gin and molasses, then gin. and onions. I took all three. When Oscar Wilde was the victim of card fraud in New York, readers learned about it in an article titled “Oscar Fleeced at Bunco”.

The writers’ marriages, illnesses, arrests, writing habits, children, money problems and vacations fueled the stories. Their deaths too. When beloved authors died, The Times ran deathbed updates – in Walt Whitman’s case, for months – that we would now find intrusive.

Considering the breadth and depth of literary coverage throughout the newspaper during those early decades, it might not come as a surprise that someone decided to put all of these stories and reviews into one section. of dedicated books. That someone was Adolph S. Ochs, who created the Book Review as a stand-alone supplement shortly after becoming the editor of the newspaper in 1896. Thus was born the New York Times Book Review, a publication which in During its 125- The story of the year has been known as “the Saturday Review of Books and Art”, “the Sunday Book Review”, “the NYTBR” or, mostly internally, simply “TBR” .

“In this publication was realized an idea from the editor of The Times that a newspaper book review should be a literary journal, treating newly published books as news and in addition containing other news of literary events.” , wrote Elmer Davis in “History of The New York Times, 1851-1921.

“Books as News” remained the watchword of the Book Review for years. “Literary criticism, which is excellent in its own way, but strictly speaking a means rather than an end, has never been the main object of its existence,” reiterates the Book Review in 1913. “An open forum for discussion of the books from all sane and honest perspectives are still available in the New York Times Book Review.

Over time, the Book Review has evolved, abandoning its saying “books as news” and embracing literary criticism, essays, theories and ideas. It has become a lens through which to look not only at literature but also the world at large, with academics and thinkers weighing in on all the people, issues, and topics covered in books: philosophy, art, science, economy, history, art and more.

J. Donald Adams, who was appointed editor of the Book Review in 1925, later recalled: “When I took over, The Times thought all you had to do was tell people what to do. that there was in the books. I wanted to make the book review something more than that. Under him, the reviews became more opinionated and the coverage wider and deeper. “Dissent in itself can be exciting, it can shed light in gray corners,” wrote Francis Brown in a brief history for the Book Review in 1968. “As our culture becomes more and more unified, the diversity is a quality to be cherished and cultivated, and how boring, stupefying it would be to agree on politics, aesthetics or whatever you like – and especially on books which, by their very being, bear witness to of the diversity of man.

James Baldwin has written for the Book Review, as has Langston Hughes. Toni Morrison was a regular contributor. Eudora Welty was on the staff briefly and reviewed figures like EB White, Virginia Woolf, and SJ Perelman. Presidents – Theodore Roosevelt, Bill Clinton, Herbert Hoover – have written reviews, as have musicians, poets, playwrights, academics, Nobel laureates, tycoons and Hollywood stars.

In many ways, the history of the Book Review is that of American letters. Through its coverage over the years, you can see how reading tastes and buying habits of American books have changed, how literary criticism has evolved, and how history – especially the two world wars – has shaped. what was written and published. Yet even though the literary landscape has changed dramatically over the past 125 years, sometimes under the influence of the Book Review, some things remain the same: as an 1897 editor’s note noted, “Life is worth it. pain to be lived. “

Excerpt from THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW: 125 YEARS OF LITERARY HISTORY edited by Tina Jordan with Noor Qasim, copyright © 2021 by The New York Times Company. Used with permission from Clarkson Potter as an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without the written permission of the publisher.


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Art to see in Paris this fall https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/art-to-see-in-paris-this-fall/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/art-to-see-in-paris-this-fall/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 09:02:52 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/art-to-see-in-paris-this-fall/ outraged FIAC and its satellite events, Paris has a rich array of visual goodies this fall – notwithstanding the pandemic and its associated rules and restrictions. Here is a selection. VUITTON FOUNDATION Five years ago, the Vuitton Foundation (the private museum in the shape of a ship designed by Frank Gehry) attracted 1.3 million visitors […]]]>

outraged FIAC and its satellite events, Paris has a rich array of visual goodies this fall – notwithstanding the pandemic and its associated rules and restrictions. Here is a selection.

VUITTON FOUNDATION Five years ago, the Vuitton Foundation (the private museum in the shape of a ship designed by Frank Gehry) attracted 1.3 million visitors to its exhibition at Shchukin Collection: masterpieces by Monet, Gauguin, Matisse and Picasso, among others, which were bought during Parisian shopping sprees by the Russian textile magnate Sergei Shchukin. These spectacular works adorned his palace in Moscow until the Russian Revolution, when they were nationalized and dispersed, and finally found their way into the best museums in Russia.

This year, the Vuitton Foundation strikes again with an exhibition of the Morozov collection, around 200 French and Russian works bought by two other textile magnates, the brothers Mikhail and Ivan Morozov, who also made multiple Parisian races. Like the Shchukin family, the Morozovs came from abject poverty: their ancestors were serfs who, during Napoleon’s occupation of Russia, made ribbons at home which they peddled in Moscow markets.

Both exhibitions were organized by Anne Baldassari, the former director of the Picasso Museum in Paris. In addition to masterpieces by Manet, Toulouse-Lautrec, Cézanne, Gauguin and Matisse (among others), visitors will discover the reconstructed music room by Ivan Morozov, adorned with seven panels by French painter Maurice Denis.

GRANDE HALLE DE LA VILLETTE Speaking of Napoleon, this is the last chance to see the extravagance devoted to him at the Grande Halle de la Villette. Visiting the show is like watching a movie on the big screen of Napoleon’s life, only with completely original props and sets. You’ll see Napoleon’s jewel-encrusted sword, tricolor sash, several of his beds, monogrammed throne, and the primitive wooden stagecoach that carried his body to its resting place on the island of St. Helena. The exhibition, which marks the bicentenary of his death, ends on December 19.

CENTRE POMPIDOU If contemporary art is more your thing, go to the Center Pompidou for what is billed as the most important retrospective of the painter Georg Baselitz, who has devoted much of his career to illustrating the challenges of growing up in Germany in the immediate postwar years.

Baselitz, who is 83, simultaneously receives what could be considered an even greater French distinction: this month he will enter the Académie des Beaux-Arts in Paris as a foreign associate member. Baselitz will occupy a seat inside the Academy which was previously occupied by two leading European filmmakers: Andrzej Wajda from Poland and Federico Fellini from Italy.

ORSAY MUSEUM Across the Pompidou River, another successful contemporary painter, South African-born Marlene Dumas, is on display with a tribute to the most famous 19th century French poet, Charles Baudelaire. Ms. Dumas has produced 14 paintings inspired by Baudelaire’s Spleen de Paris, her collection of 50 prose poems. At the same time, the Musée d’Orsay is hanging three key works by Mme Dumas alongside works from the Orsay collection.

LELONG GALLERY & COMPANY Lovers of contemporary African art can come to Galerie Lelong & Company for a personal exhibition of Barthélémy Toguo, Cameroonian painter and performer. Mr. Toguo trained in Ivory Coast and learned classical art techniques before moving to Europe and discovering new disciplines such as video and performance art. He is famous for a series of performances called “Transit” which have been staged in airports, train stations and other transport hubs. In one performance, he showed up for a flight to Paris’s main airport, Charles de Gaulle, carrying a cartridge bag full of candy. In another, he took his seat in a train compartment disguised as a sweeper, causing discomfort among travelers and leading the ticket controller to intervene.

Mr. Toguo’s exhibition in Lelong is a commemoration of the poet and writer Edmond Jabès, of Egyptian origin. The artist draws parallels between the writer and the Bamileke people of western Cameroon through a series of blue paintings that are evocations of genocide, displacement and exile. The exhibition presents an interactive installation: the public can either make a donation or send a paper or electronic message to the artist.


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Full album premiere: Le Chant Noir ‘The Satanic Society of Dead Poets’ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/full-album-premiere-le-chant-noir-the-satanic-society-of-dead-poets/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/full-album-premiere-le-chant-noir-the-satanic-society-of-dead-poets/#respond Mon, 18 Oct 2021 13:31:49 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/full-album-premiere-le-chant-noir-the-satanic-society-of-dead-poets/ Despite a French language name, The Black Song originally from Brazil. The trio – made up of multi-instrumentalist Leonardo D. Pagani, bassist / guitarist Mantus and singer Kaiaphas (ex-Ancient) – is undoubtedly Francophile, but musically Le Chant Noir haunts the same mystical but melodic realms (occupied with a given time) by Gehenna (Norway), Opera IX […]]]>

Despite a French language name, The Black Song originally from Brazil. The trio – made up of multi-instrumentalist Leonardo D. Pagani, bassist / guitarist Mantus and singer Kaiaphas (ex-Ancient) – is undoubtedly Francophile, but musically Le Chant Noir haunts the same mystical but melodic realms (occupied with a given time) by Gehenna (Norway), Opera IX (Italy) and Diabolical Masquerade (Sweden). Indeed, it is melodic / symphonic black metal, gothic not orchestral variety. What sounds like a tribute to mid-90s European black metal is actually an extension of it, decades later, but moderately improved through improved musicianship and production techniques.

Throughout the new Chant Noir album, La Satanic Society of Dead Poets, they pick up occult strings, with keyboards and melodies guiding in (and out) the proverbial fog of black metal. It’s the same endless chain that Cradle of Filth picked up as they ventured out of demo form and into Decibel Hall of Fame Album, The principle of evil made flesh. While most of The Black Song’s push is in sub-blastbeat tempi, there are plenty of points where they slow down, crumble, as if possessed by the ghosts of My Dying Bride and fellow countrymen. long-standing Mythological Cold Towers. Songs like “Night of Hell”, “The Vampire” and “The Dance of Death” oscillate between the quickest death and the coldest funeral.

Dire Le Chant Noir: “The title, The Satanic Society of the Dead Poets, is kind of a pun on The Society of the Dead Poets. The Society of Satanic Dead Poets. I used this title because most of the lyrics on this album are adaptations of poems and works by French poets such as Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud and others. There was a very strong interest in Satanism, vampirism and the occult in France, especially in the 19th century. This is the concept of this album. Dark French cabaret atmosphere.

Corrupted crescents and disgusting reblochon, Le Chant Noir offers via a ruined statue of Christ the Redeemer the entire album stream of The Satanic Society of the Dead Poets. God damn it …

** The new album of Chant Noir, La Société Satanique des Poètes Morts, is available on Personal Records on October 22, 2021. Pre-orders for the CD version are available HERE.


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Why we’re still in the cottagecore and goblincore aesthetic https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/why-were-still-in-the-cottagecore-and-goblincore-aesthetic/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/why-were-still-in-the-cottagecore-and-goblincore-aesthetic/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 11:08:43 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/why-were-still-in-the-cottagecore-and-goblincore-aesthetic/ The hyper-digitization of our lives has resulted in the birth of several fashion subcultures. With romance, nostalgia and fandom as a common thread, trends such as cottagecore, dark academia, Egirl and Eboy, Scene Kids and Goblincore have amassed a large following around the world. We take a close look at some of these trends: Read […]]]>

The hyper-digitization of our lives has resulted in the birth of several fashion subcultures. With romance, nostalgia and fandom as a common thread, trends such as cottagecore, dark academia, Egirl and Eboy, Scene Kids and Goblincore have amassed a large following around the world.

We take a close look at some of these trends:

Read also : An Instagram face, please

#Darkacademia

On Instagram, #darkacademia has more than 600,000 posts, with over 38,000 posts in a gloomy and brooding mood. As you explore the 14,000,000 #cottagecore posts, the aesthetic is striking: delicate flowers, pastels, meadow dresses reminiscent of the days when people led simpler lives.

Moreover, Instagram trends like those who run the catwalks now seem to be a thing of the past because, in a reverse fit of our time, these trends inspire the collections of luxury fashion houses like Céline, Colina Strada, Rodarte, and Iris Van Herpen.

With the closure of schools and universities last year, there has been an increase in college aesthetics, filling the void of the inability to dress for graduation, prom, or just everyone’s class. days. Its dark sister-style college, a mix of Gothic and college, also garnered a significant following, as illustrated by @ dark.academia.fashion’s 76,000 subscribers. Her biography reads “𝚍𝚘𝚗’𝚝 𝚓𝚞𝚜𝚝 𝚜𝚝𝚎𝚊𝚕 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚝𝚢𝚕𝚎, 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚝𝚑𝚒𝚗𝚔𝚒𝚗𝚐 𝚋𝚎𝚑𝚒𝚗𝚍 𝚝𝚑𝚎 𝚜𝚝𝚢𝚕𝚎” in reference to the pillars of reading, writing and learning on which aesthetics are based. “I really appreciate how this aesthetic places art and study as the foundation of an entire lifestyle,” says Ana Paula Alsan, 21, from Brazil, who started the D’Arc Academia page.

Alsan describes the dark aesthetic of academia as “classic vintage style.” People who follow this aesthetic usually buy from thrift stores and find great clothes!

A heady nostalgia marks this aesthetic as tweed blazers, plaid pants, turtlenecks, wool coats and plaid ties with a worn leather bag and coffee mug being the staple accessories. The color palette borrows from goth and punk, with tans, browns, blacks and grays being favorites with images always edited with a tinge of fall sepia. “Most of my audience is from India, they love the theme and the response is great! But if we go for Dark academia fashion, it is not really popular in India. Long coats, boots and plaids are quite different from our fashion and it’s very rare to see people dedicated to them here, ”notes Pratik Dherange, 21, from Pune who started the Deadpoetstribe page (94,000 subscribers) in February 2020.

“Donna Tartt (writer), Charles Baudelaire (writer), Caravaggio (painter), Aurora (singer)” serve as inspiration to Alsan. Harry Potter, If we were bad guys by ML Rio, Circle of Missing Poets (1989), School Ties (1992) and Kill Your Darling (2013) is also on the list of essential pop culture influences or inspirations for dark academy lovers. From the runway, Ralph Lauren’s RTW Fall 2016 collection has long served as a guide to this aesthetic.

#Cottagecore

Cottagecore combines nostalgia with a romance of nature and the desire to be outdoors.
(Courtesy Instagram / @ nadiiife)


“Imagine you are living in a Thomas Hardy novel. Or Wuthering Heights in particular. Or that you’re Anne Shirley from LM Montgomery’s books, ”says Ragini Nag Rao, or Kittehinfurs as her 24,000 Instagram followers know her. “I wanted to create the same kind of ethereal, whimsical storybook imagery that featured a fat Indian woman instead of thin white or thin Asian women,” says the Kolkata-born British resident. She describes the cottagecore aesthetic, which combines nostalgia with a romance of nature and the desire to be outdoors. Her style is heavy with puff-sleeve dresses, puffy white dresses, floral prints in pastel shades, and everything dreamy and quaint. The trend is reminiscent of the simple days of the past, spent “reading, cooking, sewing, knitting, drinking tea and frolicking in meadows and forests”. The trend seems to be taking hold on the catwalks, as evidenced by Rodarte’s floral dresses in his SS 2021 dispatch. Closer to home, Eka’s SS 2021 collection Unforgettable memories and its floral patterns on flowing silhouettes almost mimic the happiness of a simplistic life.

#Goblincore

While soaking up all the principles and aesthetics of cottagecore, the Goblincore trend extends it further with fairy dresses, colored hair, nature-inspired charms and an earthy color palette of green, brown, red and plaids. What seems like a nostalgia for the days when humans depended solely on the earth for their livelihood, the Goblincore fashion aesthetic is dominated by fungi, insects, seashells, and any other natural ephemeral that is not. “pretty” enough to qualify for cottagecore. A deep dive into #Goblincore posts on Instagram will illustrate this further, as talismans like pins, patches, charms and miniature knickknacks, as jewelry is plentiful with anything that contains moss and mushrooms. This year, the Haute Couture collection of Iris Van Herpen and designer Rahul Mishra also considered mushrooms as their main inspiration and recurring motif.

#Egirl and #Eboy

On the other end of the spectrum is a trend that echoes the kids in the mid to late 2000s scene of the MySpace era, Egirl and Eboy is the Generation Z update of the kids from the scene. Now the community is made up of teenagers amassing thousands of dollars streaming video games on Twitch, proving Cyber’s obvious influence on the trend. A scroll from Eve Fraser’s account will show that more than fashion, makeup defines the Egirl / Eboy look. Neon-colored linings, rainbow hair, and cartoon-inspired makeup with hearts under the eyes to go with fishnets, harnesses, mini skirts and t-shirts seem to be recurring. For Eboys, two-tone hair is commonplace and it’s already in fashion. Scene-era neon hair and tie-dye pants made an appearance in Colina Strada’s SS 2021 runway while Celine’s SS 2021 collection titled The dancing child is a ‘documentary’ collection covering EBoys and current skate culture, ”the show’s note read. “A frank portrait of a generation that took advantage of confinement and isolation to assert and emancipate itself creatively, spontaneously inventing an initiatory language anchored in adolescent dance and romance. It was no surprise that Celine’s new face for the collection was TikTok and Eboy star Noen Eubanks.

Read also : The beauty of being a billionaire on Instagram


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Two reporters started arguing in Boston in 1979. It’s not over yet https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/two-reporters-started-arguing-in-boston-in-1979-its-not-over-yet/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/two-reporters-started-arguing-in-boston-in-1979-its-not-over-yet/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 03:18:13 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/two-reporters-started-arguing-in-boston-in-1979-its-not-over-yet/ The subject of their disagreement was journalistic “objectivity,” a notion that dates back at least to the 1920s, when some of the more noble newspapers and magazines tried to distinguish themselves from scandal sheets and publications run by partisans and sometimes politicians. warmongers. editors. In a corner, Alan Berger. In 1979, he was a 41-year-old […]]]>

The subject of their disagreement was journalistic “objectivity,” a notion that dates back at least to the 1920s, when some of the more noble newspapers and magazines tried to distinguish themselves from scandal sheets and publications run by partisans and sometimes politicians. warmongers. editors.

In a corner, Alan Berger. In 1979, he was a 41-year-old media columnist for Real Paper, an alternative weekly born out of a break with its predecessor, Boston Phoenix. Before starting to monitor the press, Berger had grown up in the Bronx, attended Harvard University, and lectured at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in French, on the poet Charles Baudelaire.

His target in the objectivity debate – which has come to life in the political turmoil of recent years – was Tom Palmer. At the time, Palmer was a 31-year-old Associate National Editor of the Boston Globe, meaning he belonged to the establishment and therefore was an ideal target for Real Paper. Palmer had grown up in a newspaper family in Kansas City, but dreamed of being a farmer before fighting organic chemistry and ending up in his father’s trade.

The particular topic of Berger’s column, published April 21, 1979, with a front-page teaser from Real Paper, was how the media covered the Three Mile Island nuclear accident. The underlying topic was something larger – the debate within the news media industry as to when and if journalists should tell readers what they really think about issues and events on which they write. To make his point, Berger named Palmer by name, describing him as “thoughtful, honest, and entirely conventional.”

Berger wrote that he was particularly struck by something the Globe editor told him in defense of the newspaper’s cover on Three Mile Island: that it was his job “not to make the situation worse than it was not “.

In a recent interview, Berger recalled that his take on the issue was influenced by the deferential media coverage of the Vietnam War. “Excessive loyalty to his own traditional notions of balance and objectivity,” he wrote in his column, had in fact distorted reality – and Palmer’s sincere dedication to old values, Berger wrote, was exactly what was so dangerous about him.

“By the end of this millennium, the objectivity of some very honest people in the media will also make them look like irresponsible fanatics,” the columnist wrote of Palmer and others like him.

Details have changed over the decades since, but much of Berger’s column could have been written yesterday. (And alternative weeklies foreshadowed the style and tone of online journalism.) Donald Trump’s rise to power and the media’s growing awareness that a studied neutrality often hides a unique and dominant perspective has shaken many traditional assumptions. Of the industry.

A new and diverse generation of journalists sought to dismantle the old order, and much of the conflict in recent years has been unfolding at the Washington Post, whose then-editor Martin Baron had won over the Pulitzers and challenged presidents by making use of the traditional tools of news journalism. But Baron also insisted that his employees voice their opinions on Twitter on the topics they were covering.

His former protégé, national correspondent Wesley Lowery, argued in a widely circulated opinion piece in the New York Times that objectivity reflected the worldview of white journalists and editors, whose “selective truths were calibrated to avoid offending the sensitivity of white readers ”. Lowery, who ended up leaving The Post for CBS News, suggested that news agencies “drop the appearance of objectivity as an ambitious journalistic standard, and that reporters instead focus on fairness and truth, the better. as one can, based on the given context and available facts.

Tom Palmer, former editor and reporter for the Boston Globe, who said the arguments against journalistic objectivity “were completely wrong then and I think they are even more so today,” to Natick, Mass., October 9, 2021. In 1979, two reporters got into an argument – more than four decades later, they haven’t settled it. Kayana Szymczak / The New York Times

This same argument has also been adopted by some of America’s leading journalism schools.

“We focus on fairness, fact-checking and accuracy, and we don’t try to suggest to our students that their opinions should be withheld,” said Sarah Bartlett, dean of the City University of New York. Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism. “We favor transparency. “

Steve Coll, his Columbia Journalism School counterpart, who announced Thursday that he would step down in June after nine years as dean, said Columbia tries to teach fairness and intellectual honesty – adding that the he old way of thinking has turned into something new. “The church is gone and there is no more orthodoxy,” he said. “There is a lot of journalism, and it’s a little liberating.”

Much of the change has to do with the changing nature of the news industry and the decline of local newspapers, whose activities often depended on taking a stand within the institution. The internet also blurred the lines between news and opinion for readers, which were clear in a print newspaper.

The Globe’s liberal opinion page, in fact, hired Berger in 1982, a few years after scolding Palmer. The two men sometimes sat down to have lunch together in the cafeteria on the top floor of the Globe. The room had a view of the city center and, in the heyday of the newspapers, was the frequent site of Olympian debates about the role of the press, recalls another colleague, columnist Ellen Goodman.

Both men had the kind of long and varied careers that were common in major metro newspapers. Berger wrote foreign policy editorials and a foreign media column before retiring in 2011. Palmer switched between editing and reporting, covering the fall of the Berlin Wall (he brought back some of it for Goodman) and the infamous Boston Trafficking Project known as the Big Dig before a new editor, Baron, moved it to his last time, real estate. He left The Globe in 2008 and got into public relations.

Palmer never quite dropped the point. He has named himself a sort of awesome industry watchdog, ultimately known for his persistent emails to reporters and editors who he said allowed their liberal views to infiltrate their copy. He still sends a lot of emails, including to me. When he sent me Berger’s old chronicle, it stuck with me because it seemed quite contemporary to me.

Needless to say, Palmer isn’t convinced by the arguments against his cherished ideal. They were “completely wrong then,” he emailed me, “and I believe they are even more wrong today.”

“Journalists are just not smart and educated enough to change the world,” he continued. “They should damn well educate the public to the best of their ability and let the public decide. “

He also said, with regret, that he believed his team were losing. The notion of objectivity “was in decline before Trump, and that era took it completely off the table,” he wrote. “I doubt he’ll ever come back.”

Berger, in an interview, admitted that he had “to some extent” won the point. Palmer’s conventional stance in the Trump era “is starting to sound like a radical vision,” he said.

This decades-long argument does not fit perfectly with some of the most important questions of the day, those faced by journalists who won the Nobel Peace Prize last week, Maria Ressa of the Philippines and Dmitry Muratov of Russia. They have been persecuted, to the core, not because their governments dislike their style of journalism, but because their governments will not tolerate the notion of independent, truth-seeking journalism.

The original idea around the very misused notion of objectivity, when it was introduced in the 1920s, had to do with making journalism “scientific” – that is, with the idea that journalists could test hypotheses against reality and prove their claims. In the most generous interpretation, it was to establish a shared public space in which the facts could be arbitrated and to know that one could also be wrong.

Indeed, one of the easiest ways to know if you can trust a journalist, I have always found, is to check if the person is able to admit that they were wrong – which s. ‘applies to newspaper editors and moralizing columnists. People love to make fun of corrections, but it’s actually a sign of integrity.

Which brings me back to Berger’s 1979 column. Its headline, which would have worked well on Twitter if it had existed at the time, was “How The Press Blasted Three Mile Island”. His argument was that journalists – “privately anti-nuclear,” he wrote – were hiding from their readers their own opinion that nuclear power was too dangerous to use.

He quoted Palmer as saying that “it is not yet clear who is right” on the big policy issues around nuclear energy.

“If not now when?” asked Berger. “Should there be a body count in this war as well?” This line, so soon after Vietnam, stung.

Arguments over journalistic objectivity won’t be resolved anytime soon, and you can expect my last column in 2061 with Baron, 107, and Lowery, 71. But in the 1970s and 1980s, Berger’s camp won the battle against nuclear power. The US nuclear industry has never recovered from Three Mile Island, as political factors slowed and then largely halted construction of new reactors. It was a liberal triumph of the 1970s that is largely forgotten today.

And yet: Berger now believes he was wrong about this. The American left of that time did not understand the risks of carbon emissions.

“You have to re-evaluate all the values, because you have to see all the particular issues in light of the danger of drastic climate change,” he told me. Nuclear power, whatever its dangers, does not emit carbon.

And journalists, no matter what sect we belong to, must keep in mind our potential to be wrong.

© 2021 The New York Times Company


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Artist of the week on EDMsauce.com: Asi Vidal https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/artist-of-the-week-on-edmsauce-com-asi-vidal/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/artist-of-the-week-on-edmsauce-com-asi-vidal/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 20:54:08 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/artist-of-the-week-on-edmsauce-com-asi-vidal/ What about dance music fans! We hope you relax as we go through the weekend. We would really like to introduce you to our Artist of the Week this week. We are happy to welcome you, Asi Vidal! Asaf Vidal Vanunu, aka DJ Asix, better known as Asi Vidal, an international DJ, producer and remixer […]]]>

What about dance music fans! We hope you relax as we go through the weekend. We would really like to introduce you to our Artist of the Week this week. We are happy to welcome you, Asi Vidal!

Asaf Vidal Vanunu, aka DJ Asix, better known as Asi Vidal, an international DJ, producer and remixer of dance music. Asaf discovered a passion for electronic music and DJing at a young age while living in Israel. He started out collecting dance and techno music when it all started in the early 90s. Inspired by the sound of “The Prodigy” and “KLF”, he recorded music from the radio to cassettes and played the DJ at friends’ birthday parties. Asaf fell in love with Dj’ing and making people dance. Working and developing his skills over the years, he started DJing in the beautiful city of Eilat Israel, at beach parties and clubs.

“I’m so excited to release my 4’ed album. My production game is better now, so it improves the sound and the final songs that I release. I felt like I needed to get out of the electro club style that I had been producing for a long time. When I started this project, I had in mind the dark psytrance atmosphere with the warm and progressive sound of house ”. The project is inspired by artists like “The Prodigy”, “Tommy Trumpet” and “Infected Mushroom”, all tracks from the album mixed together with a big space in mind.

Asi traveled to the United States and settled in Sunshine State – Los Angeles, California, with unique sound and vision. In 2010, Asi Vidal founded Rhino Star Records, with the mission to help other DJs and producers with sample packs and production tools. The keywords that describe Asi Vidal’s productions and DJ sets are drive and flow.

Asi Vidal creates moments. And that’s why when you look at its crowd, you see smiles and hands in the shape of heart signs. Asi has released 3 albums and countless singles on her Rhino Star label. “This year (2021) my goal is to release 52 titles, 1 weak each,” he says. “I want to continue to develop my sound and release different styles under different names. like “Psytro Killer” for Psy Dance music and “HayZar” for darker Electro music, “I try to give people an unforgettable night and party with them,” he says. “I try to share the excitement and the vibes of the party.”

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When I make music in the studio, I look for the feeling in my stomach, the rhythm, the groove ”. Asi Vidal has DJed at top venues all over the United States. His sets are so dynamic that it’s sometimes hard to see how he can keep the energy going, but he does it well with creativity and diversity. You can see it also through his production work, his original work and his remixes have received support from all the big names in the industry.

With this support, Asi Vidal continues to have an ever-growing passion for dance music and produces new tracks and remixes every month. In addition, he hosts a radio show called “Electro club”, His radio show has reached great heights. Today, more than tens of thousands of listeners listen to its hour-long selection of electronic dance music every month. For 8 consecutive years and more than 200 episodes already, the Electro Club show has been and still is a highlight for many dance music lovers. Despite her accomplishments, Asi Vidal does not consider her job to be done. “Creating music, helping producers and making people dance, that’s my life”

Asi Vidal has made remixes for John Legend, Cindy Lauper, Madonna, Kylie Minogue, Katy Perry, Dua Lipa, The Weeknd, Imagine Dragons, Hardwell, Zedd, Tiesto, Infected Mushroom, Galantis, The Scorpions, and more.


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Morning titles for Slovenia: Thursday, October 14, 2021 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/morning-titles-for-slovenia-thursday-october-14-2021/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/morning-titles-for-slovenia-thursday-october-14-2021/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 02:51:04 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/morning-titles-for-slovenia-thursday-october-14-2021/ Check the date at the top of the page, and you can find all the “morning headlines” stories here. You can also follow us on Facebook and get all the news in your feed. This summary is provided by the STA: European Parliament fact-finding mission begins visit LJUBLJANA – A European Parliament fact-finding mission started […]]]>

Check the date at the top of the page, and you can find all the “morning headlines” stories here. You can also follow us on Facebook and get all the news in your feed.

This summary is provided by the STA:

European Parliament fact-finding mission begins visit

LJUBLJANA – A European Parliament fact-finding mission started its visit to Slovenia with the head of the delegation, Dutch MEP Sophie in ‘t Veld (Renew), saying their aim was to gather facts, not to bring down the government. The head of the DRFMG Monitoring Group for Democracy, Rule of Law and Fundamental Rights said it was about meeting as many representatives of diverse specters of society and institutions to get as broad an overview as possible developments in the country. She hopes they can meet Prime Minister Janez Janša until Friday, although no meeting has been scheduled.

Janša for more inclusion of local and regional communities

BRUSSELS, Belgium – Prime Minister Janez Janša presented the priorities of the Slovenian EU Presidency to the European Committee of the Regions, highlighting the post-Covid recovery, the green transition and the EU’s strategic autonomy, while discussing subsidiarity. He called for a greater degree of inclusion of local and regional communities and called for respect for subsidiarity and the fact that EU countries are representative democracies as a means of bringing the EU closer to the citizens.

Parliamentary inquiry reports pressure and reassignments in police forces

LJUBLJANA – The parliamentary inquiry into allegations of political interference in the police forces has conducted initial talks, hearing the former head of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) on the pressure exerted during the supervision of the work of the NBI , as well as layoffs and reassignments under the current government. The session also focused on the police search of the home of Economy Minister Zdravko Počivalšek in the summer of 2020 and whether he could have been warned.

A potentially elected candidate for the Constitutional Court

LJUBLJANA – President Borut Pahor has indicated that one of the four candidates for the post of judge of the Constitutional Court could have a chance of being appointed by the National Assembly, but he plans to undertake “further investigations” after having completed a series of consultations with all groups of MPs. “There are indications of sufficient support” for Rok Svetlič, associate professor of philosophy of law who teaches at two private Slovenian law schools, the Alma Mater Europaea and the European Law School, Pahor’s office said.

350 people will lose jobs as Revoz cuts production

NOVO MESTO – Revoz, the Slovenian subsidiary of Renault, has announced that it will cut production in the face of the uncertain situation in the automotive industry, from two shifts to one and a half shifts in mid-November. As a result, approximately 350 of the company’s more than 2,400 employees will lose their jobs. Daily production of 650 cars will be reduced to 480. The company is “committed” to helping displaced workers find new jobs with the employment service and partner agencies, indicating strong demand in the labor market. job.

Tensions are high but the weekly demonstration takes place peacefully

LJUBLJANA – Tensions were high in Ljubljana as opponents of Covid-19 restrictions took on the stress for the fifth week in a row, disrupting traffic in the city center for several hours. A water cannon was ready as police sought to disperse the crowd, but was not used. Unlike the previous week, the protest went smoothly, although police arrested several protesters and used tear gas against individuals.

Slovenia registers 1,227 new coronavirus cases on renewed rise

LJUBLJANA – Slovenia recorded 1,227 new cases of coronavirus on Tuesday, the second day in a row that the number of cases has increased to a weekly level. Almost 22% of all PCR tests came back positive. Five other Covid-19 patients have died. Hospitalizations fell to 420, with intensive care cases increasing from six to 122, according to government data. The National Institute of Public Health estimates that there are currently some 11,500 active cases in the country. The 14-day incidence per 100,000 population fell from 10 to 539.

Decision on STA’s prosecution request expected by early December

LJUBLJANA – Ljubljana District Court has said it will issue a decision in a debt enforcement case brought by STA against the Government Communication Office (UKOM) in late November or early December. Judge Jelka Rozman said this was a purely legal matter that did not require the testimony of witnesses, thus rejecting a proposal by the state attorney general to hear the director of UKOM as a witness. , Uroš Urbanija. Outgoing STA director Bojan Veselinovič said the case could end in the High Court, making it impossible to say how long it might take for a decision to become final.

Foreign Policy Committee reviews 2022-2023 budgets

LJUBLJANA – The Foreign Policy Committee examined the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ draft budgets for 2022 and 2023, which amount respectively to 131.96 million euros and 109.15 million euros, against 148.93 million euros euros for this year. FM Anže Logar announced that part of the funds in 2022 will be invested in improving the security of communication systems between diplomatic and consular offices. He also announced that Slovenia intends to open a new diplomatic and consular representation office, the location of which has not yet been decided.

Vrtovec discusses sustainable air transport after pandemic

BRUSSELS, Belgium – Minister of Infrastructure Jernej Vrtovec attends an International Civil Aviation Organization conference in Brussels on sustainable air transport after the Covid pandemic. He discusses the challenges associated with the pandemic with the aim of ensuring greater commitment from Contracting States to post-pandemic recovery. While air transport in Europe is not far from the pre-pandemic level, the resumption of intercontinental travel should take longer, which is why a lot of effort will have to be invested at the ICAO level to revive global air transport, he said.

DeSUS MPs do not plan to change course

LJUBLJANA – After the Pensioners Party (DeSUS) council yesterday passed a resolution denying the government any further support, party MPs said they plan to continue on the same path as so far when they s ‘hear on their vote. on each legislative proposal on a case-by-case basis. Speaking to reporters, MPs Branko Simonovič and Ivan Hršak said they would continue to support proposals they saw as good for the party and its constituents.

The best innovators rewarded

LJUBLJANA – Products developed by nine Slovenian companies, including folding skis, special steel and advanced valves, were recognized as major innovations while the Chamber of Commerce and Industry (GZS) recognized the best innovators of the country Tuesday night. The Occupational Activity Center Zasavje won a special mention for a project called Building an Inclusive, Innovative and Connected Zasavje, which was also the innovation of the year selected by the public. Economy Minister Zdravko Počivalšek said the innovators were the flagship of the transition from “commercialization of muscles to commercialization of the brain”.

Tourism goes from numbers to quality

POSTOJNA – Tourism is going through a difficult period of recovery and transformation after the pandemic, agreed participants of the Slovenian Tourism Days in Postojna. “If we just wanted to go back to the days before the pandemic, we would have missed a valuable lesson. Now is the time for improvements and upgrades,” said Economy Minister Zdravko Počivalšek. The event called for new indicators of success, focusing on the satisfaction of tourists and locals. Climate expert Lučka kajfež Bogataj urged to apply green tourism indicators such as energy consumption per night and carbon footprint of visitors.

European audiovisual and media content discussed in Ljubljana

LJUBLJANA – A two-day international conference organized under the Slovenian EU Presidency in Ljubljana focused on the accessibility and competitiveness of European audiovisual and media content. Culture Minister Vasko Simoniti said that only a strong European audiovisual sector could be competitive in the global market. Giuseppe Abbamonte, head of media policy in the Commission’s Directorate-General for Communication Networks, Content and Technology, said the Commission is monitoring trends in the audiovisual and media industries to ensure that European content was not excluded.

Indigo festival presents Varoufakis-Žižek conference and Mouse on Mars concert

LJUBLJANA – The 6th Indigo Festival, which takes place in Cukrarna in Ljubljana until Friday, features a series of events to offer a reflection on some of the most pressing issues in the world today under the slogan Mass Hypnosis. A conference between world-renowned Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek and Greek economist and leader of the leftist movement DiEM Yanis Varoufakis is scheduled for October 21. Organizers say the conference will be “far from a polite exchange of views between two like-minded colleagues.”

Photo portraits of Nadar on display at the National Gallery

LJUBLJANA – Masterpieces of Portrait, an exhibition featuring 41 portraits of the 19th century French photographer known as Nadar, has opened at the National Gallery. Gaspard-Félix Tournachon, known in his twenties as Nadar, is recognized for having contributed significantly to the development of photography as an art. Some of his subjects include writers Victor Hugo, George Sand, Charles Baudelaire, Emile Zola and Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev, and painters Eugène Delacroix, Gustave Courbet and Edouard Manet.


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5 questions to Anna Clyne (composer) https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/5-questions-to-anna-clyne-composer/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/5-questions-to-anna-clyne-composer/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/5-questions-to-anna-clyne-composer/ Born in london Anna clyne is a GRAMMY nominated acoustic and electro-acoustic music composer. Since her stint as Mead’s composer-in-residence for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (2010-2015), Clyne has been one of the most acclaimed and in-demand composers of her generation, particularly of orchestral works. At October 23-24, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by BSO Music […]]]>

Born in london Anna clyne is a GRAMMY nominated acoustic and electro-acoustic music composer. Since her stint as Mead’s composer-in-residence for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (2010-2015), Clyne has been one of the most acclaimed and in-demand composers of her generation, particularly of orchestral works. At October 23-24, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, conducted by BSO Music Director Marin Alsop, will give the world premiere of Clyne’s work Color field (a BSO commission) on a program that also includes its 2018 work, Stormy oceans, which was composed for Alsop.

Marin Alsop has been a great supporter and collaborator of your music since Masquerade (2013). Considering the importance of the composer-performer relationship, what has working with Alsop meant for your work, and how did this partnership start?

I first worked with Marin Alsop in the summer of 2010 at the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music in Santa Cruz, California, where she programmed my first orchestral work, <. Since that time Marin has performed almost all of my orchestral works, including my violin concerto, The sewer, and my cello concerto, DANCE, which she recorded with cellist Inbal Segev and the London Philharmonic, and was released on AVIE Records in 2020.

Writing a piece that I know Marin will be the first is a real inspiration to me – I love the way it moves and the way it connects with the musicians. Examples of these are Masquerade, which opened on the last night of the Proms in 2013, a monumental event marking the first time in Prom’s Last Night history that a woman had stepped onto the podium. We released the recording of this thrilling performance as part of an album Mythologies – a collection of five orchestral works recorded live by the BBC Symphony Orchestra, also released on AVIE Records last year.

I feel great mutual trust with Marin. I know that my music will be produced as I imagined it in his hands. His support for my music has been a great honor and has certainly brought my music more visibility in the United States and abroad. It is unusual for a conductor to commit to a composer beyond a piece or performance of a piece. It’s something Marin has done with other composers as well, and it’s a great gift.

Anna Clyne with Marin Alsop – Photo by RR Jones, courtesy Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music

Your two orders for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra (Abstractions and Color field) are inspired by semi-abstract or non-objective art. As it concerns Abstraction, you responded to works all produced during your lifetime by living artists for the most part. What attracted you to these particular tracks, and have you had the opportunity to meet them and discuss your musical response with any of them?

Abstractions is a suite of five movements inspired by five contrasting contemporary works from the Baltimore Museum of Art and the private collection of Rheda Becker and Robert Meyerhoff, for whom this music pays homage. I did not have the opportunity to meet the four living artists (all except Ellsworth Kelly), although I would be very curious to hear their reactions.

Inspired by these works, I tried to capture the feelings or images they evoke, the concept of the work or the process adopted by the artists. Such examples are the filtered blues and the contrast between the light falling on the earthy stone and the mysterious moon that characterizes the VanDerBeek collection. Marble Moon; the long arching lines, the compact energetic marks and the shifting and dense forms of a system on the verge of collapse in the Mehretu region omens; the serene horizon with rippled water in Sugimoto’s Seascape; the striking juxtaposition of energetic black and white lines that magnify Kelly’s brushstrokes in RiverII; and the lines, which, inspired by Asian calligraphy and the structure of seashells, seem to dance in Marden’s work 3.

The title of your other BSO commission, Color field, refers to a mid-20th century abstract painting movement, but it’s a much more complex and personal starting point. You describe the piece as being a commission from Bonnie McElveen-Hunter in honor of Melanie Sabelhaus, whose favorite color, “Hermès Orange,” led you to the work of painter Mark Rothko, who brought him back to Sabelhaus. It’s a beautiful story, but I’m curious how this detail about it has become so central to your process?

The central inspiration of Color Field is indeed a person: Melanie Sabelhaus, the winner of this work. I started the creative process when I first met Sabelhaus in New York, when I discovered her family, her Serbian roots, her work and the music she loves. She is daring, daring, generous and a trailblazer for women in business and philanthropic work.

She also likes the color orange – especially Hermès Orange – and that’s how my exploration of color began. This led me to that of Mark Rothko Orange, Red, Yellow (1961) – a powerful example of the artist’s Color Field paintings, featuring red and yellow framing a huge vibrant shade of orange that seems to vibrate on the canvas.

As I explored creating music that evokes colors, I thought about synesthesia, a perceptual phenomenon in which a person hears sound, pitch, and tonal centers, then sees specific colors, and vice versa. Every movement of Color Field weaves elements of the life of Melanie Sabelhaus. “Yellow” evokes hazy warmth and incorporates a traditional Serbian melody, first heard as a very slow bass line, then revealed amidst movement in the strings and winds. In “Red”, the fires blaze with daring percussive patterns and singing lines. In “Orange” the music becomes still and breathes, then intensifies once more, incorporating elements of “Yellow” and “Red” to create “Orange” – Melanie Sabelhaus’ signature color.

Anna Clyne chats with Cabrillo Music Director Cristian Macelaru at a Clyne's public rehearsal "DANCE for cello and orchestra"--Photo by RR Jones, courtesy of the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music

Anna Clyne chats with Cabrillo Music Director Cristian Macelaru at a public rehearsal of Clyne’s “DANCE for Cello and Orchestra” – Photo by RR Jones, courtesy Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music

I have used traditional expressions (response, inspiration, etc.) to describe your relationship with the visual arts, but I feel like this is doing you a disservice. The visual arts regularly play a role in your compositions, but you don’t just respond to a set of images – you seem to be collaborating with the artist by creating something new. How would you characterize this relationship?

I see the relationship between music and visual art as very visceral and the nature of the collaboration can change between pieces. In the case of Abstractions and Color Field, I responded to existing works of art. However, the process is sometimes reversed, as in The Violin – a suite of seven pieces for multitrack violins. My dear friend and wonderful artist Josh Dorman created seven stunning animations for each of these seven pieces – the art was created in response to the music. In other cases, the two elements are created in conjunction with each other, creating a very symbiotic relationship, as in a recent work, By, which I created in collaboration with a London artist Jyll bradley and violist of the Scottish Ensemble, Jane atkins.

This symbiotic relationship between art forms also extends to collaborations with artists from other art forms, such as choreographers and filmmakers. In other cases there is no collaborator, in which case I sometimes turn to the artistic creation myself to assist the creative process, as in Night Ferry, an orchestral work also included on Mythologies.

The first idea of Night Ferry was actually a visual image of a dark, turbulent wave, so I tried a new process – simultaneously painting the music while writing it. On my wall, I taped seven large canvases side by side horizontally, each divided into three subsections. It became my visual timeline for the duration of the music. In correlation with the composition of the music, I painted from left to right, moving forward in time. I painted a section, then composed a section, and vice versa, interweaving the two in the creation process.

Pardes (2020) of Jyll bradley to Vimeo.

Based on this, the videographers and dancers you employ in some of your chamber music works feel like you are adding another layer to your musical creation and to the concert experience as a whole. How would you describe the theatrical and ambient elements of your orchestral works?

This Midnight Time, a sort of orchestral symphonic poem, is a good example of one of my theatrical works, a recording of which is also included in Mythologies. This one is inspired by two poems. While not meant to describe a specific narrative, my intention is that it evokes a visual journey for the listener. The two poems are Harmony of Evening by Charles Baudelaire, who possesses wonderfully evocative images and musical references …

The season is at hand swinging on its rod
Each flower exhales a perfume like a censer;
Sounds and scents revolve in the evening air;
Melancholy waltz and languid vertigo!
(Translated by William Aggeler)

… And a very short poem by Juan Ramón Jiménez:

Music
a naked women
functioning crazy through the pure night!
(Translated by Robert Bly)

I often explore different approaches to orchestration to evoke more ambient elements – be it reverb orchestration – for example, in my work In her arms, a work for 15 individual strings. The music opens with a simple melody on the first violin, and other violins support the pitches of the melody to create the sonic illusion of ambient reverberation. I also explore other electronic processes in my orchestration, such as delay, inversion of sounds, time expansion, compression, and of course the processes that translate directly into orchestration, such as pitch shifting. and octave transpositions, and the combination of colors of different instruments in unison.

I CARE IF YOU LISTEN is an editorial independent program of the American Composers Forum, funded by generous donor and institutional support. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and may not represent the views of ICIYL or ACF.

A gift to ACF helps support the work of ICIYL. To learn more about ACF, visit “At ACF” section Where composateursforum.org.


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Summary of September 2021 releases https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/summary-of-september-2021-releases/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/summary-of-september-2021-releases/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 14:00:12 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/summary-of-september-2021-releases/ Happy October everyone, I hope you find some time this month to clear your backlog of horror movies, listen to King Diamond, or engage in other equally spooky pursuits. We’re kind of past September and we’re approaching the end of 2021 terribly, so before the weather slips any further, let’s think about some of the […]]]>

Happy October everyone, I hope you find some time this month to clear your backlog of horror movies, listen to King Diamond, or engage in other equally spooky pursuits. We’re kind of past September and we’re approaching the end of 2021 terribly, so before the weather slips any further, let’s think about some of the best September releases.

Other things from this month are worth noting before we begin: underground black metal darling Lamp of Murmuur has released another album by surprise, and he owns; Writer Tom Morgan has compiled an excellent list of essential Relapse Records releases, and Jimmy Monack came to speak to Steve Von Till in person, which earned him a speeding ticket. We also posted our first batch of live photos in over a year – more to come from scenes and photo pits soon, hopefully.

With all of that covered, we’ve got five drives that we strongly suggest you check out before you dive fully into the fire hose of the October releases.

—Ted Nubel

Ted nubel

TemptationThe Cradle of the Gods
September 24, 2021

I always come back to this record. Beyond the powerful and energetic heavy metal inside, there is just a certain magic in the French anthem and the exuberance behind them (especially when the backing vocals come in) that makes The Cradle of the Gods a joyfully metallic experience. Drawing inspiration from traditional heavy metal with double guitar action and occasional keyboards, the band excels at spilling blood (and spilling out) through wild classical songs with fantastic lead work and head-to-head rhythm – headed.

The band’s approach to traditional heavy metal includes a mix of thrash and fast riffs as well as slower, simpler, rock-focused, contrasting riffs – and when the double bass comes in and things get mean, you feel it. With crystal-clear production and a punchy, punchy mix, it’s absurdly easy to just crank that up and let it rule my mood for a while. As we desperately get closer to the end of 2021, that kind of uncompromising fun is what I’ve been looking for.

Ivan Belcic

MastiffLeave me the ashes of the earth
September 10, 2021

Over the past year and a half, and for obvious reasons, music as an escape has been a major theme in much of music writing. I’ve framed the music this way, others here have framed it that way – it’s a very valid and often genuinely therapeutic way to consume music and process our feelings not just about COVID, but also of the myriad of other crises which are currently hitting the world.

But sometimes it’s just as healthy, if not more, to face our collective and personal grief, anxiety and hopelessness head-on. When used in excess or in isolation, escape and other forms of denial kick down the road in terms of dealing with uncomfortable realities and the negative feelings that they cause. And when it comes time to fight the wriggling discomfort inside us, there’s Mastiff and their latest record Leave me the ashes of the earth.

There is no respite to be found in this relentless bludgeoning of resentment and annoyance. Instead, the group sinks their grime-encrusted thumbs into your eyes as they hold you below the surface, your lungs seeking the clean air of distraction and finding only the cold, impartial water of anguish. and disgust.

Colin Dempsey

Ars MoriendiThe Unreasonable Silence of Heaven
September 24, 2021

The atmospheric component of atmospheric black metal usually involves loneliness, which is a limiting approach because atmospheric, by definition, does not refer to a particular feeling, but rather to the power of a track. The Unreasonable Silence of Heaven, from the one-man band Ars Moriendi, is an atmospheric triumph where this atmosphere is a fantastic tale of Charles Baudelaire‘s poem Get drunk. For the uninitiated, the poem is an open endorsement for breaking on all the bounties of life. While this includes healthier indulgences like poetry and virtue, it also helps scoop up a few pints to break free.

The Unreasonable Silence of Heaven takes Baudelaire’s sentiments and turns them into a freewheeling medieval celebration. Ars Moriendi carries Baudelaire’s calls for freedom through Gothic romanticism, weeping synths, melodramatic voices and moments of dark jazz. The album is as whimsical as an Arthurian myth while offering the best symphonic black metal of this year. It is a cavalcade of melodic tracks à la Iron Maiden and a tapestry of freedom of composition. The Unreasonable Silence of Heaven gets drunk on its own fumes, and that’s good.

Tom Campagna

The teethFinished PE
September 10, 2021

Opening an EP with nearly seven and a half minutes of death metal dragging coffins as doom is a terribly important statement, but Teeth more than lives up to it. Starting things off with ‘A Garden of Eyes’, the new Finished EP leaves no doubt in its path; it is unadorned heaviness of the highest degree. The trail later slows down to allow for spoken word passages that allow for some subtlety before Erol Ulug unleashes some of his ugliest statements to date.

The rest of this case does not have the same chronological weight, but manages to get its point across in different ways. Two fast tracks manage to vary their sounds into the slow heaviness and more heaviness of death than you would expect from them, followed by the remaining two slabs: in particular, “Scornful Nexus” features wonderfully frightening moments where every sound produced by the group is built. on itself before enveloping the listener in absolute darkness. Teeth manages to pull out a lot of an EP, making it a “bite-sized” affair that doesn’t lack what you’d expect. After seeing this collective in Philly last weekend, their live show reflects these facts even better.

Joe april

To othersStrength
September 24, 2021

For all those who know me well, it should come as no surprise that my favorite album from last September was the second album from Unto Others. Strength, considering that their previous debut album was my favorite album of 2019. Yet it was under their old name of Idle Hands that they had to give up last year due to an earlier mark that seemed to come out of nowhere . A name change can often be a major stumbling block in a band’s career, especially once they’ve had some success using the previous name (as shown by their first place on the last one). King Diamond tour), but fear not, as in the same period of time the band was taken over by the big metal label Roadrunner Records, which is now part of Elektra Records and the Warner Music Group. The new band Unto Others now has the same team that puts bands like Gojira and Slipknot in large amphitheatres behind their backs.

With Strength as the next musical step in their future, Unto Others is certainly able to stand with confidence on any great stage given to them. The core of the band’s sound remains intact, a triumphant traditional metal sound with melancholy and expressive baritone touches from singer / songwriter Gabe Franco pushing them towards gothic rock. Imagine a hesher with his fist raised draped in denim and leather but with tears in his eyes, carrying books by Neil Gaiman and Edgar Allan Poe under the other arm. It’s all expertly crafted into one-length songs packed with eye-catching hooks that will have you singing or swinging in your car or at a festival. Developing on this core, however, is a clearer production than the beginnings Mana handled with flourishes of more extreme influences like black / death metal screams and riffs straight out of a Slayer album, as we notice on tracks like the opener “Heroin”. Almost any track could function as a radio hit, although the surprise cover of Pat Benatar’s “Hell is for Children” in 1980 could easily blow the group into higher realms. With well-crafted gear still flowing like overflowing honey and the support of deep pockets, Unto Others has the opportunity to take on the world with their mark of contagious gloom.


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The True Meaning of “Sir Baudelaire” by Tyler, The Creator Ft. DJ Drama https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/the-true-meaning-of-sir-baudelaire-by-tyler-the-creator-ft-dj-drama/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/the-true-meaning-of-sir-baudelaire-by-tyler-the-creator-ft-dj-drama/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 19:41:00 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/the-true-meaning-of-sir-baudelaire-by-tyler-the-creator-ft-dj-drama/ Throughout his career, Tyler, the creator has assumed many alter egos. From Ace, the creator to Wolf Haley, the California-born rapper is known for going beyond just one identity. With the June release of “Call Me If You Get Lost”, Tyler released a new gadget – Sir / Tyler Baudelaire. A direct reference to the […]]]>

Throughout his career, Tyler, the creator has assumed many alter egos. From Ace, the creator to Wolf Haley, the California-born rapper is known for going beyond just one identity. With the June release of “Call Me If You Get Lost”, Tyler released a new gadget – Sir / Tyler Baudelaire. A direct reference to the sophisticated French poet Charles Baudelaire, Tyler Baudelaire is one of the world’s travelers – noted by his Twitter location (“somewhere in Geneva, small boat”) and the album cover, which includes Baudelaire’s passport.

“Sir Baudelaire” advances the tradition behind Tyler’s voyages to the world. After some back and forth between Tyler and the legendary producer DJ Drama, the rapper declares: “Cookie crumbs in the Rolls, vest scented with jet fuel / Swimsuit in the trunk, Geneva water is the best / The passport looks thick, afro needs a pickaxe “(via Genie). Here we see the fortune the rapper amassed over the course of his career – riding in a Rolls Royce, touring Switzerland and fattening his passport trips. It’s certainly a far cry from his Odd Future days, but have no qualms about it, Tyler doesn’t come across as a swagger or pretentious. He just says it as it is.

Alright, maybe he is a little boastful. “Lake water, dry at Roland Garros / I rub it on these niggas faces like heavy lotion,” Tyler later raps. We appreciate honesty, Sir Baudelaire.



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