Charles baudelaire – Commonfolk Using Common Sense http://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/ Thu, 22 Jul 2021 06:06:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-99.png Charles baudelaire – Commonfolk Using Common Sense http://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/ 32 32 Explore (re) discover the legendary bars of Brussels https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/explore-re-discover-the-legendary-bars-of-brussels/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/explore-re-discover-the-legendary-bars-of-brussels/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 06:37:41 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/explore-re-discover-the-legendary-bars-of-brussels/ If you spend the summer in Brussels, I promise: you won’t be bored. Many activities are available to you, such as this exploration game that you have discovered Secret Brussels, which allows you to discover the old quarters of the capital. Brussels old town It offers the curious to discover the most famous beer in […]]]>

If you spend the summer in Brussels, I promise: you won’t be bored. Many activities are available to you, such as this exploration game that you have discovered Secret Brussels, which allows you to discover the old quarters of the capital. Brussels old town It offers the curious to discover the most famous beer in the country, to discover stories about the underground river and about famous people who liked to drink a pint in Brussels.

In the shoes of a budding brewer

ThisThe first treasure hunt app turns Brussels into a life-size exploration ground. Do you think you know our beloved capital like the back of your hand? You might be surprised. For more than an hour and a half, you are in the 1800s, slipping into the shoes of the brewer’s son of a small village near Brussels.

Despite your laziness, you have no choice but to help your father. In fact, the latter threatens to kick you out, unless you learn how to make beer. You have no other choice. Select, you open the doors of all the bars of the capital to collect the best tips and recipes for making good beer. A well-crafted plot allows you to learn the hidden stories of the city. In particular, you will discover the bars frequented by famous figures of the time such as the surrealist painter René Magritte and the poet Charles Baudelaire. In order to find the best beer recipe, you will have to solve twelve puzzles. The clues will be hidden all over Brussels. Be careful , This challenges you: “Will you be able to do what your father tells you to do, or will you end up with a record? Hangover in the gutter?

The treasure hunt begins at the brewery golden paper flower. With the smartphone in hand, you will need to follow the instructions in the app. To participate, you will need to pay 14.99 for two people. To find out more, click iover there.

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10 anime characters with the most embarrassing secrets https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/10-anime-characters-with-the-most-embarrassing-secrets/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/10-anime-characters-with-the-most-embarrassing-secrets/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 23:30:00 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/10-anime-characters-with-the-most-embarrassing-secrets/ The discomfort is relative. Some secrets are dangerous and potentially dangerous while others are more about maintaining a facade. For an anime hero, a heavy metal character is something you keep from the neighbors. For others, it is a past story of violence that interferes with divine ambitions. RELATED: Elder Scrolls: 10 Surprising Things Hidden […]]]>

The discomfort is relative. Some secrets are dangerous and potentially dangerous while others are more about maintaining a facade. For an anime hero, a heavy metal character is something you keep from the neighbors. For others, it is a past story of violence that interferes with divine ambitions.

RELATED: Elder Scrolls: 10 Surprising Things Hidden In Canonical Lore

In some stories, one secret spawns another – a clandestine agreement to keep the secret, a secret. This is often where the real story begins. Here’s a look at the heroes and the secrets they keep.

ten Soichi Negishi is embarrassed by his Death Metal character (Detroit Metal City)

Souichi Negishi from Detroit Metal City

Soichi Negishi is a young musician who dreams of becoming a pop singer. But his not-so-great original songs don’t pay the bills. He adopts a second secret character from Johannes Krauser II, singer and guitarist of a death metal band called Detroit Metal City.

As an outrageous leader, rumors are circulating that he killed his parents, and worse. Much of the laughter in this dark comedy comes from his attempts to alternate between his two contrasting characters and the humiliating fact that Krauser does so well when the pop songs he loves to perform go nowhere.

9 Haruka Nogizaka is embarrassed by her love for anime and manga (The Secret of Haruka Nogizaka)

Haruka Nogizaka - anime

Beautiful and talented, Haruka Nogizaka is the most popular student at Hakujo Academy. Her embarrassing secret is that she’s an otaku – something that can tarnish her reputation as a social star at her prestigious school.

An otaku is seen as an anti-social and unpopular person. Yuuto Ayase one day discovers his secret by accident in the library, and when he agrees to keep it to herself, it marks the beginning of an unlikely friendship that pulls Yuuto out of his shell.

8 Kuroe Akaishi must avoid touching people as an involuntary shapeshifter (Kaiju Girl Caramelise)

Caramelization Kaiju Girl

Kuroe Akaishi looks like an ordinary girl from the outside, but she suffers from a very rare condition called involuntary shape change. Her classmates only know that she has a mysterious illness and call her Psycho-tan at school, where she is lonely.

When Arata, a popular boy at school, invites her out, she must avoid touching him all night so as not to trigger an unintentional transformation. It gets worse – in the end, he finds out that she is a kaiju with both human form and monster form.

7 Takao Kasuga’s impulsive act causes big trouble (Flowers of Evil)

Aku No Hana

Takao Kasuga returns to school one day to pick up his favorite book – Charles Baudelaire‘s The evil flowers (or The evil flowers). He stumbles upon some athletic clothes left behind by Nanako Saeki, the girl he had a huge crush on.

RELATED: 10 Biggest Troublemakers In School Anime

In a foolish impulse, he steals the sports clothes and brings them home. The next day, school is buzzing with gossip – who’s the weirdo stealing clothes? Unfortunately, Sawa Nakamura knows all about her humiliating secret and forces her to enter into a contract to keep her silent.

6 In Kenji Harima’s world, his manga art is a secret (School Rumble)

Kenji Harima - School Rumble

Kenji Harima is an ex-offender, but his reputation is still pretty rough around the edges. He engages in a lot of fights, and it’s usually his crush, Tenma. He begins to draw manga, and while the art itself becomes more and more public as he gains success, he keeps his work a secret from everyone in his private life except the Tenma’s sister, Yakumo. It’s a combination of a little embarrassment and vulnerability, and a lack of trust in someone other than her that leads him to keep him undercover.

5 Koro-Sensei didn’t detonate anything (assassination classroom)

Koro-Sensei teaches his last lessons

Koro-sensei is a monster with tentacles and a smiley face in Assassination class. He tells everyone that he blew up the moon and will destroy the Earth in a year unless the brave college kids he teaches can stop him.

His secret is that he didn’t detonate anything and the moon was an unrelated accident. If they knew the truth, that he only wanted to help the students in class 3-E at Kunugigaoka Junior High in memory of the woman he loved, it wouldn’t only be embarrassing, he would lose the teaching job. .

4 Yato would like everyone to forget about his war god past (Noragami)

Yato (Noragami)

Yato hopes that one day he will have his own following of worshipers on Noragami. He tells everyone that he is a delivery god and that he does odd jobs on the cheap. His big secret is that his old life was spent as the god of war and calamity.

RELATED: The Seven Deadly Sins: What Are the Ten Commandments?

He fulfilled his role with relish and wreaked havoc and destruction on humanity as much as he could. Today, he takes a different path, and he would prefer that his violent and destructive past remain that one.hidden in the past.

3 Everything might not be able to maintain its own strength (My Hero Academia)

Izuku and all the power of my hero university

All Might is a superhero, also called the symbol of peace, on My hero university. Like all real superheroes, he spends his time saving people and defeating villains. But, following a previous injury, All Might can only maintain his muscular superhero form for about an hour.

Not only is it embarrassing for the superhero to be seen in his slim, unsportsmanlike body, it could be dangerous as the bad guys would no longer be afraid of him. To hide it from his students, he is sometimes forced to evade his teaching duties and hide in the principal’s office.

2 Arata Kaizaki is not a student – She is an adult who gets a second chance (ReLIFE)

ReVie

Arata Kaizaki’s life is bleak, especially after a work accident. He is 27 years old and struggles to scratch himself while working part-time in a convenience store. When offered the chance to relive a year of high school by the ReLIFE Research Institute, he seizes it.

Back at Aoba High School, the only condition is that he can’t tell anyone about the experience, otherwise it’s over. The point is, reliving high school is as embarrassing as it gets.

1 Misaki Ayuzawa cannot tell her family that she works in a Maid Cafe (Kaichou Wa Maid-sama!)

misaki ayuzawa maid-sama

Misaki Ayuzawa is class president in Kaichou Wa Maid-sama!, and she takes her job very seriously, especially when it comes to school safety. She wants to improve the atmosphere for herself and for other female students, and she’s not afraid to get physical when confronting lewd classmates.

Misaki comes from a poor family, and she works in a maid cafe dressed as a sexy French maid to help pay the bills. Naturally, those classmates would make his life miserable if they found out his secret … until one day someone found out.

NEXT: Sailor Moon: 10 Easter Eggs You Will Only Notice During A Rewatch

The final villains


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10 best final villains in the anime, ranked


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CORES OF WISDOM: the number one enemy of every man and woman https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/cores-of-wisdom-the-number-one-enemy-of-every-man-and-woman/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/cores-of-wisdom-the-number-one-enemy-of-every-man-and-woman/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 06:21:54 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/cores-of-wisdom-the-number-one-enemy-of-every-man-and-woman/ Breadcrumb Links Notice Column Author of the article: Rev. Eric strachan Photo by Getty Images Content of the article According to a national survey by the Canadian Mental Health Association, “In 2019, 2.5% of Canadians reported having had thoughts of suicide in the past year. In comparison, at the height of the pandemic in May […]]]>

Content of the article

According to a national survey by the Canadian Mental Health Association, “In 2019, 2.5% of Canadians reported having had thoughts of suicide in the past year. In comparison, at the height of the pandemic in May 2020, this survey found that 1 in 20 Canadians (6%) had recently had thoughts or feelings of suicide as a result of the pandemic. That’s a staggering increase, and I’m sure if we did a similar survey in the summer of 2021, we would find that the 6% figure has not decreased.

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Content of the article

In a normal year in our country, according to Government of Canada statistics, around 11 people commit suicide every day, resulting in around 4,000 deaths per year, but with the onset of the COVID-19 era, there are had a significant increase in these numbers. .

The theme of today’s column is certainly not the most uplifting, but it is necessary to talk about it and bring a perspective to the subject of suicide which is rarely if ever discussed. Allow me to preface my presentation on this topic by referring to other Canadian statistics. In a 21st century Gallup poll, when pollsters asked him, “Do you believe in the devil? 37 percent of us Canadians said ‘yes’, while 17 percent said they weren’t sure, but nearly half of our population, a whopping 45 percent, said categorically do not believe it. So it’s no wonder, based on these statistics, that Charles Baudelaire once said, “The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was to convince the world that he didn’t exist.

Now, in our contemporary secular Canadian society, to suggest that there is such a malevolent being as the Devil is seen, in some eyes, as a religious madman. Traditionally, our society has given little credit to the existence of a real personality called the Devil. Rather, he often viewed him as a mythological being with his usual red costume, forked tail, pointy ears, horns, and trident. But make no mistake dear friend, when you examine Bible truth you discover the reality that Satan, another of his names, has been alive and well on planet earth since the beginning of time.

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Open the pages of the Bible and you will discover its influence on the human species. In the Gospel of John, Jesus refers to him as the thief. He said, “The thief has come to seek, destroy and kill. (The Bible, John 10:10) It is the satanic mandate, to destroy you my friend. And he does this primarily by attacking the mind. Really, your mind is the devil’s playground. He will plant thoughts in your mind, and in your deception you will think that these are your own thoughts. “I am not good.” “I will never get over this depression.” “I’ll never get out of the hole.” “Life is not worth living.”

The COVID-19 era has seen a surprising increase in depression. The Devil is at the climax!

The Bible tells the sad story of Judas. He had become the devil’s tool, used as a stool pigeon to betray Jesus Christ. In pointed terms, the Bible says, “Then Satan entered into Judas. (The Bible, Luke 22: 3) Judas was unaware of it, he was completely unaware. But after being used and manipulated, he “got remorseful” (The Bible, Matthew 22: 3) and in his sheer inability to cope with his mental breakdown, we were told, “… (The Bible, Matthew 27: 5)

Dear friend, do not believe for a single minute the experts in Canadian society who categorically state that there is no such thing as the devil. He is, make no mistake, your great enemy, and your only sure and sure defense against him is to have a daily connection with Jesus Christ, the Son of God. Don’t give the devil a thumbs up. Live for God. Fill your mind with Bible truth, and in the battle for your spirit, you will be victorious every time.

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France buys the manuscript of 120 days of Sodom from the Marquis de Sade https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/france-buys-the-manuscript-of-120-days-of-sodom-from-the-marquis-de-sade-2/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/france-buys-the-manuscript-of-120-days-of-sodom-from-the-marquis-de-sade-2/#respond Sun, 11 Jul 2021 10:30:18 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/france-buys-the-manuscript-of-120-days-of-sodom-from-the-marquis-de-sade-2/ A manuscript manuscript of 120 Days of Sodom, the notorious and controversial 18th-century novel by the Marquis de Sade, has been acquired by France for 4.55 million euros. The work tells the story of the sexual orgies of four wealthy libertine men, aged 45 to 60, who rape, torture and murder their young victims in […]]]>

A manuscript manuscript of 120 Days of Sodom, the notorious and controversial 18th-century novel by the Marquis de Sade, has been acquired by France for 4.55 million euros.

The work tells the story of the sexual orgies of four wealthy libertine men, aged 45 to 60, who rape, torture and murder their young victims in a remote castle in the Black Forest.

Sade’s work and his underlying philosophy of extremity and excess, while still highly controversial, have inspired many greats over the years, including painter Francisco Goya, poet Charles Baudelaire, and philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche.

The origins of sadism

Until the twentieth century, Sade’s contribution to literature was largely overshadowed by the scandal of his writings, which inspired the word “sadism”. The focus then shifted to examining his philosophy.

The 120 Days of Sodom was banned in Britain in the 1950s, due to its sexually violent content, but has since become a penguin classic.

“This has deeply influenced many authors,” said the French Ministry of Culture after securing the manuscript. It will be kept at the Bibliothèque de l’Arsenal in Paris.

The cost of the acquisition was borne by Emmanuel Boussard, former investment banker and co-founder of the Boussard & Gavaudan investment fund.

“He wanted to testify to his particular attachment to the Arsenal Library, of which his grandfather was curator between 1943 and 1964”, specifies the Ministry of Culture.

Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis de Sade, spent much of his life behind bars as a libertine persecuted by the Ancien Régime and by the regimes resulting from the French Revolution.

The 120 Days of Sodom (originally published as Les Cent Vingt Journées de Sodome) was written while he was imprisoned in the Bastille in 1785 and was never completed.

Measuring over 12 meters in length, the immaculately preserved scroll consists of 33 pages glued end to end and covered in barely legible handwriting due to its small size.

It was saved from the Bastille by a revolutionary, Arnoux de Saint-Maximin, who sold it to an aristocrat, the Marquis de Villeneuve-Trans.

The manuscript was then acquired by a German psychiatrist, who first authorized its publication in 1904.

It was then bought by a collector and then stolen by a publisher, who sold it to another collector. In 2014, it became the property of businessman Gérard Lhéritier, founder of the company Aristophil.

Following a fraud investigation and the liquidation of Aristophil, the French government classified the manuscript as a “national treasure” in 2017.

The manuscript will be presented at a conference in 2022, aimed at questioning Sade’s image, the reception of his work over the centuries and its interpretation today, the ministry said.


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First Look – Todd Haynes Documentary The Velvet Underground https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/first-look-todd-haynes-documentary-the-velvet-underground/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/first-look-todd-haynes-documentary-the-velvet-underground/#respond Wed, 07 Jul 2021 22:15:57 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/first-look-todd-haynes-documentary-the-velvet-underground/ The velvet metro begins with a quote from the French poet Charles Baudelaire: “Music probes the sky. That doesn’t explain much about the next two hours, but it makes it clear that director Todd Haynes views the group from the perspective of a fellow artist rather than an archivist. The director of I am not […]]]>

The velvet metro begins with a quote from the French poet Charles Baudelaire: “Music probes the sky. That doesn’t explain much about the next two hours, but it makes it clear that director Todd Haynes views the group from the perspective of a fellow artist rather than an archivist.

The director of I am not here try to understand what the Velvets reached rather than expose the facts of or and when they did it. Which is just as good, as Velvets’ history is notoriously slippery. After all, this is a band whose careers have gone through many twists and turns and challenges that could have killed less stubborn bands: when John Cale was fired, when Sterling Morrison ran away, when Lou reed stop and when Maureen Tucker finally left Doug yule tour the group in nominative form to UK students on a university tour in 1973.

Haynes opens his film on familiar ground. We are given the contrasting stories of Reed (the troubled teenage rock’n’roller from Brooklyn who thought he was going to score a Billboard hit with a novelty dance tune called “The Ostrich”) and Cale (the classically trained Welshman whose head has been turned by the avant-garde movement). Around them, the gang of unlikely bed-mates quickly unite – Tucker, then Morrison, then Nico, whose introduction by the manager Andy warhol turned out to be a stroke of genius. Much as Warhol polarized pop culture, the Velvets and their entourage seemed to settle in direct contrast to the dominant vibes of the late ’60s. As the Age of Aquarius reached its peak, the group’s choice of clothing and clothing. black shades sent a clear message to the generation of love. “Burn your bra?” »Sneers Marie Woronov, one of Warhol’s Superstars. “What’s wrong with you?” “

The account is provided by interviews with eyewitnesses. In addition to the surviving band members Cale, Tucker and Yule (the voices of Reed and Morrison are also present), Haynes brings together friends, family, fans and fellow travelers, including the avant-garde film archivist. Jonas Mekas, sister of Reed Merrill, composer La Monte Jeune and Jonathan richman – who says he must have seen the group “60 or 70 times”.

Haynes immerses us in a mind-boggling archive – including Warhol’s studied screentests of empty, bored band faces, rehearsal sequences, poetry readings, tapes of conversations. He manipulates this material like an underground movie from a 1960s art lab, frequently using a split screen, lens flare, and pinion holes – much like the films of Jack smith, Kenneth Anger and Bruce conner, whose work he samples. But there is a strange paradox here. After claiming solidarity with the outside artists of his time – he names the writers Hubert Selby Jr, William burroughs and Jean Rechy – Reed apparently develops issues with his band getting too present, shooting Warhol first, then Cale and looking for a smoother, more intimate sound. Post-Cale, Reed will attempt to break through California and – a far worse crime – let the group appear in the light of day wearing floral shirts (in some ways the film could be interpreted as a Joker-style of Lou Reed’s origins).

Either way, the end was clearly in sight. As one interviewee wisely explains, the secret to the band’s music was its simplicity – they never added, only subtracted, and didn’t record anything they couldn’t play live. The same, rather sad thing is true of the band itself – which ended with a series of subtractions until there were none left, like that. It’s to Haynes’ credit that he doesn’t try to romanticize their failure (Tucker says she thought Verve only signed them “to keep us off the streets”), but instead tries to put the viewer in his head, as if he is hearing their music for the first time. It’s a bold move – but, perhaps unsurprisingly for a filmmaker operating at Haynes’ level, it works.

The Velvet Underground is screened out of competition at the 74th Cannes Film Festival this year; it will air on Apple TV + later this year


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Eating or smoking weed: what’s best for your health? https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/eating-or-smoking-weed-whats-best-for-your-health/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/eating-or-smoking-weed-whats-best-for-your-health/#respond Sun, 04 Jul 2021 14:07:22 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/eating-or-smoking-weed-whats-best-for-your-health/ Millions of people around the world have used marijuana since the 1950s, but for those of us new to the game, learning more about the life of cannabis is a great first step. After all, nothing beats practice informed by knowledge. There are so many great resources from books, articles, and even cannabis video websites […]]]>

Millions of people around the world have used marijuana since the 1950s, but for those of us new to the game, learning more about the life of cannabis is a great first step. After all, nothing beats practice informed by knowledge. There are so many great resources from books, articles, and even cannabis video websites to learn. So, without further ado, here’s what you need to know about the life of cannabis and its contributions to culture and lifestyle:

A brief history of the life of cannabis

With marijuana only becoming common in recent years, you might think that the beneficial uses of this plant are a new discovery. However, did you know that our ancestors used this plant for a variety of purposes? From agriculture and industry to the arts and recreation, humans have valued the plant throughout our history. The processing of hemp fibers allowed our ancestors to create textiles, papers, ropes and plastics. Studies show that before using cannabidiol oil, some important historical figures have used this herb for spiritual and creative purposes.

From psychedelic 60s hippies to new generation hipsters, smoking marijuana is a counter-culture around the world. In fact, the term “420” originated from a group of high school students’ code for “let’s go together at 4:20 am to smoke weed.” The group of boys, known as The Waldos, went against the grain as they smoked this wonderful plant. This was in 1971 and the term has stuck until today, containing only a much more common and inclusive meaning.

Now that marijuana is gaining acceptance in many parts of the world, the plant may stop being a counterculture and begin to be part of the mainstream. Today, many subcultures around the world over the years have incorporated some level of marijuana use into their respective lifestyles.

What’s even more fascinating is that even non-marijuana users know and recognize the celebration of Weed Day. On April 20, you will see thousands of people (amateurs and non-amateurs) greet each other with a warm “Happy 420! “

The influence of cannabis in cultivation

In addition to creating their own personal vacations, enthusiasts also enjoyed the taste of marijuana in the crop. Many creative works can thank marijuana for their existence. Studies show that this plant plays a role in the creative process, making it a viable source of inspiration for artists.

In the litterature

Many literary works were written while the authors were under the influence of marijuana. This includes Les Misérables, a literary masterpiece by writer Victor Hugo, who was a member of Club Des Hashinchins, a group of enthusiasts who used the plant at some of their meetings. This club also includes other writers such as Alexandre Dumas, Charles Baudelaire and Honoré de Balzac.

In music

Music is perhaps one of the most popular parts of growing cannabis. From Noble Award winner Bob Dylan to Panic! At Disco’s Brendon Urie there are certainly a lot of musicians who are inspired by this plant. In fact, Dylan has a song that says “Everybody’s gotta get high”. Meanwhile, Uriah, who suffers from ADHD, holds a medical marijuana card.

Aside from the individual artists using this herb, there is a whole musical genre that showcases marijuana. You guessed it: it’s Reggae. Native to Jamaica, this genus is believed to support the herb. Many Reggae musicians address this herb in their songs. Bob Marley even worked on developing a brand of marijuana called Marley Natural.

Other cultural aspects that marijuana has penetrated include fashion and design, especially with the rise of cannabis-inspired fashion brands such as Sundae School. There are even retailers now that offer marijuana accessories like a marijuana ring and weed necklaces.

The role of cannabis in the way of life

Besides its prevalence in culture, marijuana also plays an important role in lifestyle. It has created a niche in many markets including medicine, beauty, and health products. Many people have incorporated this herb into their daily routine, proving its potential as a lifestyle herb.

In addition to medical treatments

When it comes to medicine, cannabidiol is the cannabinoid that comes to mind. This compound is known for its properties which help relieve pain, inflammation and spasms. In addition, it is also found to be useful in the treatment of tumors and the treatment of cancer patients. Patients who suffer from cachexia, nausea, and vomiting from cancer treatments are given CBD for relief.

As a sleep aid

For people without debilitating conditions, but who suffer from difficulty sleeping, this herb is also a viable treatment. People with insomnia who have trouble sleeping but can only get disturbed sleep may take CBD oil to induce restful sleep. Plus, this compound is great for boosting energy, so it feels more energetic when you wake up.

For stress relief

While CBD is great for helping people with sleep issues, THC is known for its psychoactive effects. This makes it a great stress reliever at the end of a long work week. What’s more, it can also help treat mental and mood disorders, including depression, PTSD, anxiety, and other similar conditions.

Beauty of cannabis

Finally, with the various medicinal benefits of the plant, more and more cosmetic products now have the plant as an ingredient. It’s a great idea, especially since this plant has regulatory properties, which makes it perfect for hydrating dry skin and controlling oily skin. Plus, its anti-itch, pain, and inflammation properties help cannabinoid-infused beauty products treat skin conditions such as acne, eczema, and even psoriasis.

How you can live the cannabis life

As the plant becomes more and more common, especially in light of legalization in various parts of the world, many people are now free to continue the cannabis life. In fact, hundreds of dispensaries have sprung up to make cannabis products more accessible to more people. So if you are eager to join this culture and way of life, here is the best way to do it:

Start with the tinctures

Not everyone is comfortable with the direct consumption of dried bud. For those who want a smoother, less adventurous entry into the world of cannabis, tinctures are your best bet. Basically these are hemp oil packaged in bottles with dropper for easier and controlled use. You can take it sublingually or by placing a few drops under your tongue and waiting for it to take effect.

Tinctures are ideal for a variety of medicinal and recreational purposes, as you can get pure CBD oil or one infused with it. THC oil. This gives you the option of taking advantage of the medicinal properties of CBD or using THC for its psychoactive effects. With these products, you can easily use cannabinoids for pain relief, anxiety treatment, and sleeping pills.

You might be thinking, “How is this a product more suitable for beginners?” In addition to their ease of use, cannabinoid oils can be mixed with a variety of foods and drinks. You can simply infuse your dishes or drinks with this oil. From savory foods such as pasta to baked goods such as cookies, infusing your recipes with this is surely a great way to start.

Get a taste of the real thing

Once your taste buds get used to the grassy taste the oils can give, you may be more comfortable trying the dried buds. However, don’t be too overwhelmed by the sheer number of varieties you can choose from. There are hundreds of varieties available at dispensaries, each with their own unique properties. Some have a high CBD content, while others have more THC. Some have a generally weed scent, while others have a more pleasant aroma. So if you ever get overwhelmed, just ask the budtender at your local clinic for help.

If smoking isn’t your thing, you can certainly use your dried buds in a lot of other ways. Those who liked the ease of tinctures may want to make some themselves. cannabis oil, especially since cannabinoids bind fairly well to fats. You can also use your leaves to make a pesto sauce or incorporate them into baked goods.

Explore your options

One of the best things about legalizing marijuana is that companies now have the freedom to develop cannabis-infused products. This has increased the number of products to hundreds of options. Of CBD vape oil to gummy candies, you now have the opportunity to ingest this herb in many innovative and fun ways.

You can blend in with vapers by grabbing a vape pen and filling it with cannabis juice. Additionally, you can take alcohol-free hemp wine and beers to enjoy drinks without the effects of alcohol but with the benefits of marijuana. If you want to get a dose of this weed without looking suspicious, you can just put some cannabis infused candy in your mouth and get a delicious dose.

Cannabis has made its way into culture and the way of life, making it a more prevalent option in the mainstream market. With thousands of cannabis products to choose from, you can start living the pot life right now. Who knows, you might even make your contribution to the culture and lifestyle. Now that would be a great way to live a fulfilling and enjoyable cannabis life!


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Mind lock in India https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/mind-lock-in-india/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/mind-lock-in-india/#respond Sun, 04 Jul 2021 12:34:12 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/mind-lock-in-india/ I texted my best friend days after the massive second wave of COVID-19 infections started in India in April, right after symptoms hit me suddenly and transformed my nose in a piece of plastic: Do you sometimes want to see yourself in a movie or TV series to find out what happened to you in […]]]>
I texted my best friend days after the massive second wave of COVID-19 infections started in India in April, right after symptoms hit me suddenly and transformed my nose in a piece of plastic:

Do you sometimes want to see yourself in a movie or TV series to find out what happened to you in the end? Like when you meet someone new, or when you move to a new city, or when you have a new job, or when you experience a pandemic. You know, under these dire circumstances, don’t you want to know what the future looks like for you?

I had tested negative and was vigilant in my 40s. So I was gripped by the prevalent idea at the time that the government was rigging the number of infections, and I felt better being thankful that my symptoms were mild. Confined in my room, I began to read Manash Firaq Bhattacharjee’s collection of essays, City is slowly emptying: on life and culture during lockdown.

As I perused the book as the virus took its toll in Delhi (the city Bhattacharjee writes so lovingly about and where I also live), I felt a burning sensation inside. A few days earlier, literary critic Parul Sehgal had tweeted that Delhi had become a “pyre”. This was by no means an exaggeration. In April, the dead piled up in Delhi. COVID-19 was back in a rampaging avatar and was swallowing the lives of people regardless of their age. The government’s slow efforts to vaccinate the nation have been the biggest of its failures, and we have all been caught in the clutches of the howling virus.

Bhattacharjee dedicates the book: “To the eucalyptus beside my patio for its rustle of leaves, birds and ancient companionship”, and it’s a break. He writes in great detail on various aspects of life under the 2020 COVID-19 lockdowns in Delhi: waiters at food markets, lonely dogs lying on the street, Kollam fish curry. Bhattacharjee reveals himself as a seasoned ethnographer of the diverse moods of a place in this sharp but twisty range of essays.

The last essay in the collection was written on April 14, 2020; I would start showing symptoms on this same date the following year. A strange synchronicity ran between the book and my current situation. The house Bhattacharjee stayed in while writing these essays is in the same area of ​​Delhi where I live. Like him, I spent much of my summer 2020 locked up waking up in the wee hours or not falling asleep until I saw the sun come up each morning. Like him, I too have traveled the various paths of cinema, literature and conversation to make my quarantine a little more bearable:

Containment […] sparked a renewed interaction with nature. The sudden disruption of the mechanized routine of life and the conventional, everyday connections to the world have led people to look elsewhere. There they found nature. […] This accidental love and this return to nature were undertaken under duress. It can remain transitory. Passing passion is the essence of modern existence. People have treated the environment as a dresser: both by physically flushing the trees around them and flushing out memory.

The pandemic has given many of us a taste of too much unstructured time. In 2020, during the barren loneliness of my forties, I spent much of my time revisiting old books, movies, and my own journals. What was new, however, was my increased attention to nature. Like Bhattacharjee and his eucalyptus, I spent time on my little balcony, looking at a gulmohar tree whose flowers I photographed.

But the philosophical reflections of the lockdown are harder to follow this time around as death floats all around us. In college, I loved Charles Baudelaire‘s vision of the amateur flâneur. But as I read Bhattacharjee now, the modern need for escape feels heavier than natural to me.

Last year, under one of the world’s toughest lockdowns, the number of cases in India appeared to be under control. Even though we were locked up for excessively long periods of time, devoid of everyday life, a sort of security permeated the air. The virus was not affecting as many people as we had feared. This calm, even this tranquility, floats through the pages of Bhattacharjee’s writings:

The pandemic had forced my mind to swim back and retrieve what it remembered as something close to heaven. Heaven has been stupidly included in history as a place for everyone. Each person has their own paradise, and yet it is a singularly impossible place to visit. Our dreams take us to this place. It is pastoral because it has passed. It’s pre-industrial, pre-modern, an escape from modern, urban life.

We seemed to be on a way back to normal. Few people have heeded social distancing standards more, and the government has encouraged a post-pandemic line of thinking. In March, I woke up uncomfortable. Vaccination for those in their thirties like me was and remains a distant dream. Bhattacharjee’s essays quickly put together a film of frivolous intellectual deliberation. At another time, I might have succumbed to the temptation to read about the pandemic as a masochistic pursuit, thinking that Bhattacharjee’s portrayals of his city’s reluctance, his fishy cuisine, and his reading, were a nostalgic and ironic reading of myself. -insulation. But I was both too angry and too sad to appreciate thoughts like this:

I was happy to be among the trees and birds after living for seven years in a one-room apartment that overlooked the ugly backs of other apartment buildings. The days were already slowing down. I used to spend days and long hours at home. I sometimes taught an elective course in lyric poetry in college and took care of that for a while. Otherwise, I mostly wrote. The confinement did not shock me in a new life.

Flying too far from the present moment, his thoughts seemed strangely inappropriate. There was no more joy in our moorings now. The trees and birds outside my balcony brought no comfort to their silent community. The whole country had exploded in a forest fire. In some areas of our Delhi district, not a single family has been spared. If I were to read my pandemic life field notes for 2020, I might have similar recordings, but they would now look sepia, hazy, and slightly temperamental.

In India, the types of writers who belong to the upper middle class, including Bhattacharjee and I, are prone to dreaming, collecting hazy mosaics of pretty prose. We are expected to line up and write sternly like Megha Majumdar and Arundhati Roy, sketching a grim portrait of our “great Indian democracy”. Perhaps a beautiful prose like that of Bhattacharjee has no place in a country so cruel to its own people. Perhaps the deeply moving compositions, creative fiction and non-fiction can be left to “outsiders”. Perhaps we are better off if we are able to write that novel, that handful of essays, or that melancholy poetry that casts a keen eye on the life and times of the East.

Perhaps Bhattacharjee published this book too soon. The murderous spring of 2021 was predictable. The confinement of the mind will continue.

¤

Anandi Mishra is a writer in Delhi.


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A poet in search of the soul of Dublin https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/a-poet-in-search-of-the-soul-of-dublin/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/a-poet-in-search-of-the-soul-of-dublin/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 23:01:55 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/a-poet-in-search-of-the-soul-of-dublin/ Before doing a TV interview with him at the Museum of Literature Ireland (MoLi) earlier this week, I had never knowingly met Peter Sirr. But our paths must have crossed several times over the years. On the one hand, we live in the same postal district: Dublin 8. On the other hand, the places he […]]]>

Before doing a TV interview with him at the Museum of Literature Ireland (MoLi) earlier this week, I had never knowingly met Peter Sirr. But our paths must have crossed several times over the years. On the one hand, we live in the same postal district: Dublin 8. On the other hand, the places he describes in his aptly named new book, Intimate City, were already so familiar to me that I feel like for having followed him everywhere in his research.

The difference is that, with his highly published poetic eye, he puts names to emotions that have also crossed my mind – but which have not been identified.

Take this, for example, in one of his essays: “There is a special kind of desolation that can only be reached through curtains. . . “I know these curtains well, common to small towns as well as to city streets:” old curtains which rot in the windows of which they protect the rooms, curtains which announce their abatement to all those who are curious enough to look, curtains that have lowered their arms. “Or this one, on a similar theme, more specific to Dublin:” The most abandoned houses are those with the most bells. I also know these bells, having lived on the other side. side of a few.Perhaps economists should design a new kind of bell curve, to map the decline of once grand homes that have become investment opportunities.

On the other hand, Sirr’s book also makes me want to revisit places where I missed or half-noticed the things it describes. In a chapter on “the pleasure of the small streets”, he lists several in the northern city center, including rue Fontenoy, which I only walked through because it was one of James Joyce’s many addresses on the road. descending economic trajectory of the family.

But for Sirr, the delight of modest homes there is how unknown craftsmen of the past borrowed effects from the city’s grandest architecture – transoms, door frames, ironwork, etc. – and incorporated them in a reduced but still elaborate way, with multiple variations. .

Nowhere is downscaling more evident than in the tiny “gardens”. These are often barely large enough to deserve description. “But the point of having the small area in front is to have nice balustrades around; it is part of the entrance theater.

Dublin’s past isn’t always so beautiful, of course. As he explores the city, Sirr also delves into a dark history, nowhere more than in and around Thomas Street, the scene of Robert Emmet’s doomed uprising. For a glimpse of the circumstances of the time, the books call as a witness James Whitelaw, rector of the church outside which Emmet was hanged, who a few years earlier had carried out a census of the town.

In general, Whitelaw found Dublin less populated than previously thought. But it counted 108 residents in a house; visited another (with only 37), whose roof was leaking, the scent of a slaughterhouse erupted through the back door, while the door to a family room was confiscated for unpaid rent. Seeing such scenes, he became angry not only at the conditions, “but the infuriating passivity of the occupants.”

One of the book’s most striking chapters concerns the flâneur – the traditional city walker – going where he “has no business to be”, at random. The pronoun is deliberate: only men, and rich men, have historically had the leisure to do so. Maybe that has changed.

The book quotes Walter Benjamin and Charles Baudelaire to suggest that the flâneur tradition is “a displacement of solitary male sexuality”, nothing less. For Benjamin, walking through a city offers “tantalizing glimpses of possible lives”. Often the preview is through a window, but sometimes it is shared with a romanticized stranger, passing by and never to be seen again. As he wrote: “The delight of the urban poet is love – not at the first glance, but at the last glance. “

Sirr also devotes a chapter to a map of Dublin, John Rocque’s 1756 classic. Rocque had already made London much bigger and friends warned against wasting his talents on the Liffey. He disagreed, admiring the majesty of the docks and other features which, despite centuries of change, still form the hallmark skeleton of the city today.

But he also admired the locals. “The Irish maintain the most amiable society; are frank, polite, affable, take pleasure in living a lot with each other, and their honor to treat strangers with politeness and civility.

The people of Dublin have also undergone a great modernization since 1756. But like the ancient form of the city, perhaps the ancient charms also survive today, although sometimes below the surface.


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The SF artist goes underground with the “ecstatic” art installation BART – J. https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/the-sf-artist-goes-underground-with-the-ecstatic-art-installation-bart-j-2/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/the-sf-artist-goes-underground-with-the-ecstatic-art-installation-bart-j-2/#respond Thu, 01 Jul 2021 19:01:41 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/the-sf-artist-goes-underground-with-the-ecstatic-art-installation-bart-j-2/ When Amy Trachtenberg was a student at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris 40 years ago, she fell in love … with the great stations of the 19th and 20th centuries. Intrigued by the interface of transit hubs with the human experience of train travel, she chose to write her thesis on this subject. Decades […]]]>

When Amy Trachtenberg was a student at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris 40 years ago, she fell in love … with the great stations of the 19th and 20th centuries. Intrigued by the interface of transit hubs with the human experience of train travel, she chose to write her thesis on this subject.

Decades later, the San Francisco artist had the opportunity to shape the aesthetic of a station near his home: the new Milpitas BART station.

Commissioned to create a public artwork, Trachtenberg’s work can be seen on 20 structural columns on the platform.

“I have always been intrigued by columns and pillars as sculptural objects,” she says, recalling those she saw when living in France and when visiting temples and sacred sites in India. , North Africa, Mexico and Southeast Asia. (It’s a topic she explored in “Groundwork,” a 2007 commission for a library in San Jose.)

The stylish station opened in June 2020 to a greatly reduced commuter load due to the pandemic. Now that things are on the move again, BART passengers will encounter light columns adorned with warm-colored tiles evoking spices such as saffron and turmeric.

Built into the color scheme is a pattern that results from a weaving technique known as ikat, which Trachtenberg chose after researching the community that the station would largely serve.

Amy Tractenberg’s “Ecstatic Voyaging” is an installation of patterned ceramic tiles on the columns of the Milpitas BART station.

Milpitas, a town of 80,000 inhabitants, contains a patchwork of national and ethnic identities, and some 40 languages ​​are spoken by its inhabitants. Trachtenberg often incorporates textiles into his formal mixed media work, and it occurred to him that the ikat could speak of this diversity and provide a unifying motif.

A soft and energetic zigzag design, ikat appears in textiles native to Indonesia, Central America, Africa, Asia and Eurasia.

“It’s an ancient and very complex form of weaving, recognizable in many cultures,” she says. “Word ikat literally means “to tie and bind”.

A local ceramic company, Fireclay Tile, helped Trachtenberg magnify his ikat designs to create an intricate layout of custom glazed tiles that wrap around the eight-sided columns of the station. On the platform, they rise up like exclamation marks, and seen from the windows of a moving BART train, they “become more of an environment, a kinetic experience in which the viewer, and not the work of art. , moves, ”she says.

She named the work “Ecstatic Voyaging”, a favorite expression of the French poet Charles Baudelaire.

Because the new line extension (towards Milpitas and Berryessa / North San Jose) finally places BART in Silicon Valley, the artist has added a contemporary element to his ikat design: the lines and patterns formed in the silicon chip.

“People working in the tech industry recognize computer imaging… in tiles,” says Trachtenberg.

Born and raised in Pittsburgh, Trachtenberg is the granddaughter of Eastern European Jews. His father, Allen, sold men’s clothing as an itinerant salesperson and moved the family of seven to California to take advantage of that state’s public education system. (Trachtenberg received his BA in French and Liberal Studies from Sonoma State University before coming to Paris.) His mother, Mitzi, was a visual artist specializing in collage.

Amy Trachtenberg integrated silicon chip circuit patterns with old ikat textile patterns to create the designs of "Ecstatic journey," the new installation of the Milpitas BART station.
Amy Trachtenberg integrated silicon chip circuit patterns with old ikat textile patterns to create the designs for “Ecstatic Voyaging”, Milpitas’ new BART station facility.

“I come from textiles,” says Trachtenberg. “Many generations of men in my family were shmatte vendors, and I grew up playing with fabric sample books. My maternal grandmother sewed dresses for my sister and I from scraps.

Trachtenberg has featured works in a long list of exhibitions, including the 2015 “Found / Made” group show at the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles and a 2019 solo show at the Luggage Store gallery in San Francisco.

Currently, his works are part of two group exhibitions: “Break and Bleed” at the San Jose Museum of Art and “Open Field” at the Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco. This latest exhibition partially pays homage to German Jewish refugee and Bauhaus artist Anni Albers and Bay Area sculptor Ruth Asawa. Trachtenberg’s contribution is a new work made from deconstructed painted bras, tied and tied in a suspended structure.

“In this room, and in all my work which includes found fabrics and materials, the human presence is there through the inclusion of everyday objects,” she says.

It also has a work in progress on the facade of the new CG Jung Institute building in San Francisco. It’s done in ceramic tiles and is based on a pattern “borrowed from quilts and embroidery,” she says.

No one can predict how long in the future Milpitas’ new BART station will be in use, but the ceramic tiles from the station’s construction and Trachtenberg’s “Ecstatic Voyaging” could last over 100 years, said Jennifer Easton, responsible for the artistic program of BART.

“If the goal of BART and VTA [Valley Transit Authority] is to provide a democratic public transport system for all, “says Trachtenberg,” mine was to express how this station finally unites the diverse peoples of the Great Bay region and their countless reasons for traveling.

“Ecstatic Voyaging” at Milpitas BART Station, 1755 S. Milpitas Blvd.


“Open Field: nine artists respond to the ideals of Black Mountain College”

Limited capacity, masks compulsory. Until September 11. At the Catharine Clark Gallery, 248 Utah St., SF Free.


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Sitkovetsky Trio releases animated film about composer Ravel in Paris | Music https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/sitkovetsky-trio-releases-animated-film-about-composer-ravel-in-paris-music/ https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/sitkovetsky-trio-releases-animated-film-about-composer-ravel-in-paris-music/#respond Tue, 29 Jun 2021 17:24:35 +0000 https://commonfolkusingcommonsense.com/sitkovetsky-trio-releases-animated-film-about-composer-ravel-in-paris-music/ Artist Pavel Hudec illustrates some of the influences to be heard in Ravel’s haunting music written in 1914 Author: Jon JacobPosted 9 hours ago The Sitkovetsky trio have released an animated film depicting composer Maurice Ravel in and around Paris, ahead of the trio’s new album release later this week. Animation by artist Pavel Hudec […]]]>

Artist Pavel Hudec illustrates some of the influences to be heard in Ravel’s haunting music written in 1914

Author: Jon JacobPosted 9 hours ago

The Sitkovetsky trio have released an animated film depicting composer Maurice Ravel in and around Paris, ahead of the trio’s new album release later this week.

Animation by artist Pavel Hudec illustrates some of the influences that can be heard in Ravel’s haunting music written in 1914.

“The film shows some of the events surrounding the creation of the Ravel Piano Trio in A minor,” explained violinist Alexander Sitkovetsky, “and the different influences that Ravel drew on, his Basque roots and the rush to finish the piece as the world war 1 drew closer.

“The host Pavel Hudec placed Ravel in an absolutely magnificent Paris: the light, almost impressionistic design of the city contrasts so well with the rich and deep colors of his native Basque region of Saint-Jean-de-Luz. Various characters appear throughout the film. , including of course the cheeky addition of our Trio at the Théâtre Châtelet.

“We are delighted to share it with everyone.”

The new recording of the Sitkovetsky Trio combines Ravel’s trio with Piano Trio No. 2 in E minor, Op. 92 and marks the trio’s fourth release on BIS Records.

What is a Pantoum?

The pantoum is a poem of any length with repeating lines appearing throughout the poem. It consists of groups of four lines, the second and fourth lines of which serve as the first and third lines of the next group. The last line of a pantoum is often the same as the first.

Pantoums were favored by French and British writers in the 19th century, notably Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire.


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